Storm Point

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

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5 Reviews
5 out of 5
Storm Point is a hiking trail in Park County, Wyoming. It is within Yellowstone National Park. It is 2.1 miles long and begins at 7,784 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 4.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 440 feet. Near the trailhead there are a wood and a parking. The Storm Point (elevation 7,756 feet) cliff can be seen along the trail. There is also an information board along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Storm Point is a hiking trail in Park County, Wyoming. It is within Yellowstone National Park. It is 2.1 miles long and begins at 7,784 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 4.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 440 feet. Near the trailhead there are a wood and a parking. The Storm Point (elevation 7,756 feet) cliff can be seen along the trail. There is also an information board along the trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Yellowstone National Park
Distance: 2.1
Elevation Gain: 440 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 7,784 feet
Top Elevation: 7,786 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Storm Point
Parks: Yellowstone National Park
Elevation Min/Max: 7739/7786 ft
Elevation Start/End: 7784/7784 ft

Storm Point Professional Reviews and Guides

"A short loop with a great view of Yellowstone Lake and an option for ranger-led interpretive tours."

"This hike passes Indian Pond, a historic camping site for Indians, to the northeast shore of Yellowstone Lake. The trail leads thorough forests and meadows to Storm Point, a tree-covered rocky bluff overlooking the 87,000-acre Yellowstone Lake. In late spring and early summer, bears frequent this area."

Recent Trail Reviews

4/7/2010
0

By far, this was my favorite of the easy hikes we took. Just beautiful... from the flowers, to the water, to the marmots living there.... so worth it... JUST GO!


6/16/2008
0

An easy, mostly level walk out to Storm Point on the shore of Lake Yellowstone. We saw lots of Marmots on the way out, and one at the lakeshore that seemed to be just sitting enjoying the view across the lake, and who could blame him, because the view is fantastic. There was not a breath of wind on our visit, and the lake was like a mirror, with the snow-covered Absaroka Mountains reflected perfectly in the water. The hike back takes you along the lakeshore and then through a cool, inviting stand of lodgepole pine.


5/31/2006
1

This trail is a great short loop that takes you to a great view of Yellowstone Lake and through some beautiful lodge pole pine groves. Easy walking conditions and well marked. It is a perfect "quick" hike if you are limited on time. We ran into a park ranger on the trail that said they have had several grizzly sightings in the area over the previous few days (but not enough to close the trail). We made our presence known as we hikes with loud talking and laughter so we would not surprise any bears. You may want to check at the Fisherman's Bridge Visitor Center for a report on bear activity on this trail since it is supposed to be a favorite haunt of Yellowstone's grizzlies.


7/1/2001
1

This is so relaxing and beautiful! My mother and I left the boys to fish while we experienced this delightful hike. The trail is mostly level, and leads you through many different types of habitats. It starts in a meadow, passing two small lakes that were full of ducks when we were there. From there, it's a short jaunt to the shore of Yellowstone Lake, and the trail winds along the shore until you reach Storm Point. Standing on the point and looking out across this vast body of water can almost make you feel that you are the only person within miles of here. After the point, the trail turns back into the forest, and it's like a whole new world. The little sunlight that filters in gives this place a cathedral-like appearance, absolutely awe-inspiring. This is definitely my favorite short hike in Yellowstone, and my mother's, too!


3/9/2001
0

My families favorite hike. I think we have done this hike every year for the last 3 or 4. You hike out to Storm Point for a great view of the lake then continue on along the shore and back into the forest (don't go back the way you came in...you'll miss a great hike). The trail is flat and easy, but it can be very windy on the point (it's called Storm Point for a reason!) Bring your camera ! This is grizzly country so make some noise and go in a group of 4 or more. The Ranger lead hike is very nice and very educational. The trail gets enough use that you don't need to be exceptionally bear-a-phobic...just make some noise and pay attention. Stay on the trail and out of the snags! Despite all the comments about bears (I have never seen one on this trail) I would still highly recommend it for families.



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May 2018