Lamar River

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

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Lamar River is a hiking trail in Park County, Wyoming. It is within Yellowstone National Park. It is 13.2 miles long and begins at 6,742 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 26.6 miles with a total elevation gain of 5,413 feet. The 3L4, 3L6, and 3F1 camp sites can be seen along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Lamar River is a hiking trail in Park County, Wyoming. It is within Yellowstone National Park. It is 13.2 miles long and begins at 6,742 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 26.6 miles with a total elevation gain of 5,413 feet. The 3L4, 3L6, and 3F1 camp sites can be seen along the trail. This trail connects with the following: 3l2, Cache Creek Trail and Miller Creek.
Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Yellowstone National Park
Distance: 13.2
Elevation Gain: 5,413 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 6,742 feet
Top Elevation: 7,331 feet
Parks: Yellowstone National Park
Elevation Min/Max: 6742/7331 ft
Elevation Start/End: 6742/6742 ft

Lamar River Professional Reviews and Guides

"An easy to moderate backpacking trip or moderate to long day hike, depending on distance, with great fishing and a short side trip to Wahb Springs. The 1988 fires scorched most of the Lamar River Valley, but the entire area has made a nice recovery. It’s still a popular hiking and horse-packing trail, and the river still offers excellent fishing.

You can do as much of the Lamar as you choose. You can hike 3.5 miles into Cache Creek and stay at one of the campsites there. You can go the full 16 miles to where the trail splits into the Frost Lake and Cold Creek Trails. Or you can do anything in between. You can also make this a long day hike, but most people prefer to stay at least one night."

"The trail descends briefly to a footbridge over Soda Butte Creek and then crosses the huge sagebrush-covered flats of the Lamar Valley. Since this trip starts at a relatively low elevation, this area has a noticeably different feel than most other parts of Yellowstone National Park. Instead of the park’s usual lodgepole pines covering a mountain slope or plateau, the vegetation here is dominated by sagebrush and grasses in a broad and incredibly wildlife-rich valley. In fact, except for a smattering of quaking aspens and the few conifers that rim this scenic valley, there are no trees at all. The openness of your surroundings allows for some of the park’s best wildlife viewing. Bison are abundant—and their large “paddies” are everywhere, so watch your step. You also stand a good chance of seeing pronghorns, coyotes, mountain bluebirds, and ravens. Lucky hikers might spot a pack of wolves or see a badger (badger holes are everywhere, even though hikers rarely see their residents)."

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Jun 2018