Bighorn Pass

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 82190

Distance18.4mi
Elevation Gain4,664ft
Trailhead Elevation7,218ft
Top9,097ft
Elevation Min/Max7218/9097ft
Elevation Start/End7218/7218ft

Bighorn Pass

Bighorn Pass is a hiking trail in Park County, Wyoming. It is within Yellowstone National Park. It is 18.4 miles long and begins at 7,218 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 36.6 miles with a total elevation gain of 4,664 feet. The trail ends near the 1B1 camp site. This trail connects with the following: Fawn Pass-Bighorn Pass Cutoff, Wb3, 1b1, Wb1 and Beaver Ponds.

Bighorn Pass Professional Reviews and Guides

"Like the Fawn Pass Trail, the route over Bighorn Pass goes through the Gallatin Range bear-management area, a vital cub-rearing area where the National Park Service manages recreation to minimize impact on bear behavior.

You can’t camp inside the boundaries of the area, and that restriction more or less turns this into a long day hike—not a problem for a well-conditioned hiker. The NPS also prohibits off -trail travel in the bear-management area and recommends groups of four or more hikers."

"Located 72 miles south of Bozeman, Montana, and 20 miles north of West Yellowstone, Montana, in the very northwest corner of the Wyoming part of Yellowstone National Park. A 2-or-more-day journey into the wild, high peak beauty of the Gallatin Range.

Note: The lower 5 miles of this trail traverses amazingly flat and open country, making for a great day hike; however, this trail can be connected with the Fawn Pass Trail to the north to become a multi-day loop hike."

"The slightly uphill trail begins by going west through a forest of young lodgepole pines that are slowly recovering from the massive fires of 1988. Most of the trees are only about 15 feet tall, so shade is something of a rarity. The extra sunshine allowed in by the shorter trees, however, has led to fine wildflower displays from late June to early August and generally better views. After 0.1 mile you come to a junction. Go right on Bighorn Loop and soon walk past several car campsites in Indian Creek Campground. At 0.3 mile follow the campground’s loop road for 10 yards before veering left back onto the trail."

Bighorn Pass Reviews

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2/28/2001
I found the Bighorn Pass trail to be a beautiful escape into the Gallatin range. I saw many elk and bison along the way and although the elk were weary bison seem to show no concern about an approaching human (keep this in mind if there is one on the trail. They generally do not run away like a deer or an elk so give them space). The 1st half of the trail was rather flat but became steep as the actual pass was approached. Great views in either direction open up at this point. The trail follows the Gallatin and Panther rivers closely at points and there are a few sketchy bridges along the way. Otherwise the trail was generally open and free of obstruction.
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Trail Information

Yellowstone National Park
Nearby City
Yellowstone National Park
Parks
Yellowstone National Park Headquarters (307) 344-7381
Local Contacts
Trails Illustrated Mammoth Hot Springs; USGS Mammoth, Quadrant Mountain, Joseph Peak, Three Rivers Peak, and Divide Lake
Local Maps