Garnet Canyon Trail

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

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6 Reviews
4 out of 5
Garnet Canyon Trail is a hiking trail in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It is within Grand Teton National Park. It is 1.4 miles long and begins at 8,410 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 2.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,075 feet. The Platform Campsites camp site can be seen along the trail. The trail ends near the Garnet Meadows camp site.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Garnet Canyon Trail is a hiking trail in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It is within Grand Teton National Park. It is 1.4 miles long and begins at 8,410 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 2.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,075 feet. The Platform Campsites camp site can be seen along the trail. The trail ends near the Garnet Meadows camp site. This trail connects with the following: Amphitheater Lake Trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Grand Teton National Park
Distance: 1.4
Elevation Gain: 1,075 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 8,410 feet
Top Elevation: 9,204 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Garnet Canyon Trail
Parks: Grand Teton National Park
Elevation Min/Max: 8394/9204 ft
Elevation Start/End: 8410/8410 ft

Garnet Canyon Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"A popular route for those climbing the big peaks, but also a nice day hike"

"Garnet Canyon is a narrow V-shaped canyon in the upper Tetons. The canyon is surrounded by Disappointment Peak, Teepe Pillar, Middle Teton, and Nez Perce. Garnet Creek, formed by runoff from Middle Teton Glacier, cascades through the canyon on its journey to Bradley Lake. Spalding Falls, at an elevation of 10,000 feet, is the highest named waterfall in the national park. The falls cascades 80 feet off the rocky cliffs into The Meadows, a boulder-strewn meadow framed by the jagged peaks. Below The Meadows, at the mouth of Garnet Canyon, the creek cascades another 50 feet over Cleft Falls. The hike begins in Lupine Meadows and follows the strenuous route to Surprise and Amphitheater Lakes before veering west into Garnet Canyon. The Garnet Canyon Trail is primarily used by rock climbers tackling Middle Teton, Teepe Pillar, or Grand Teton. All off-trail hiking requires registration at the ranger station."

"Garnet Canyon is a rugged, narrow, V-shaped canyon draining from the upper Teton peaks. The canyon is surrounded by Disappointment Peak, Tepee Pillar, Middle Teton, and Nez Perce. Garnet Creek, formed by runoff from Middle Teton Glacier, cascades through the canyon on its journey to Bradley Lake."

Recent Trail Reviews

8/2/2011
0

This seemed like a great hike, but a bear was in the middle of the trail eating berries off the bushes, so we turned around.


9/12/2009
0

great hike, beautiful canyon, quite a bit of vertical though, I hiked this en route to climbing the Grand Teton. Lots of climbers on trail, even in September.


9/4/2009
0

Very popular hike with wide and well maintained trails. The views going up are not as spectacular as you are in the woods most of the time. The two lakes are interesting, but nothing heart stopping. The only adventure of our trip was the fact that there were reports of bear activity, so we were on the "bear - aware" look out the entire time.


7/27/2006
0

We hiked this with our kids. It was relatively easy. The trail was narrow, but well kept. The heat and elevation weren't a factor, but the kids were thrilled when we came out so they could swim in Jenny Lake. It's really beautiful and not too busy when we went. We met some local train runners, but other than that, it was quiet.


7/25/2005
0

We did the south end of the lake loop (2 miles) and then hiked up to Hidden Falls & Inspiration Point, taking the boat back to the start. We had the lake trail completely to ourselves, except for a bear cub we saw near the campground. Fortunately his mama stayed hidden! Go early--people take the boat over constantly so the 2 short hikes get crowded quickly. Views are worth it all.



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May 2018