Greenbrier River Trail

Greenbrier County, West Virginia

Distance77.1mi
Elevation Gain7,917ft
Trailhead Elevation2,434ft
Top2,434ft
Elevation Min/Max1703/2434ft
Elevation Start/End2434/2434ft

Greenbrier River Trail

Greenbrier River Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Greenbrier County and Pocahontas County, West Virginia. It is 77.1 miles long and begins at 2,434 feet altitude.

Greenbrier River Trail Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

Mary Reed
"The Greenbrier River Trail has the combined raw beauty plus infrastructure to make for an idyllic West Virginia outing. The flat 80.7-mile rail trail hugs the riffling Greenbrier River, the longest undammed river in the East. Mountains rise steeply 1,000 feet above the river valley, revealing new vistas with every step. You can travel for miles without any intrusion by civilization, yet primitive trailside campsites are augmented by the occasional small town or bed-and-breakfast for resupply and creature comforts."

Greenbrier River Trail Trip Reports

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6/6/2018
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9/4/2008
I rode about 2/3 of the trail from Cass to Rennick. I enjoyed the scenery very much
but did not like the loose large gravel surface, especially from Cass to Marlinton.
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8/28/2008
From Caldwell to Cass, this trail is one of the most enjoyable bike rides in the area. The twists and turns of the trail provide such beautiful views of the river. The trail is particularly nice in the fall and in the late afternoon/evening when the sun is low in the sky and shadows are cast from the ridges down to the river valley. A wonderful experience in the Alleghany Mountains.
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8/1/2007
Great rail-trail. My brother, myself and then 12 year old son rode it. We were dropped off at Cass mid-day and rode down to Marlinton. We ate there and stayed in a nice Bed & Breakfast. After a large breakfast we headed south. A large black bear with THREE cubs crossed the trail in front of us just south of Marlinton. Plenty of water (hand pumps) along the way as well as toilets. The gravel used in some sections is more suited for fatter tires. Finished out in Caldwell that afternoon.
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8/25/2006
We rode from Marlinton to Seebert (20 miles roundtrip) and Marlinton to Clover Lick (30 miles round trip) and then Seebert to Renick ( about 25 round trip). The entire trail was well maintained with very few riders. We stayed at Naturally You Bed and Breakfast in Marlinton, which was excellent. The tunnels and bridges were cool.Do not eat at The River Place in Marlinton. Go to the Elk River Restaurant, just north of Marlinton on Highway 219. The food is excellent and they serve alcohol! (The town of Marlinton does not have alcohol available)
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7/24/2006
The trail itself was well kept. We did a 27 mile section of the northern-most section starting at Cass going south to Marlington. The trail is all gravel though and extremely tough on the feet. Other than that, very good.

If you are up for a hot shower and a good night's sleep, there is a bed and breakfast in Marlington called the Old Clark Inn that was very cozy, had a great breakfast and the rates were good too. Not a bad way to start the day!
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7/23/2006
A beautiful trail...picked wild berries on our breaks...it follows along a beautiful river, and we saw very few people along the way. Cass downstream is gorgeous!
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5/15/2006
Biked the section between North Caldwell and Anthony. Very pleasant and scenic
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2/20/2006
I am fortunate enough to have a place on the trail, just north of Seebert and Watoga State Park. It is beautiful year round. The trail is one percent grade with pack small gravel. The scenery is second to none with the river on your right or left. It is great to put your fishing pole on your bike and head out for another adventure.
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7/19/2002
The base for our adventure was Watoga State Park which makes a nice halfway camping point. Appalachian Sport in Marlinton is highly recommended for shuttling on the Greenbrier.

After starting at 10:30 with a beautiful sunny morning for our setting, we set off on a 36 mile bike ride back to Watoga. This section of trail is quite scenic following bends in the river with views of the mountains along the way. Our only qualm was the excessive use of gravel in some sections, causing our bike tires to wallow about a bit. We enjoyed riding through the Sharps Mountain tunnel and explored its entrances. Several nice bridges along the way. The one I found photogenic was a bridge built around 1920 by Bethlehem Steel. Weathering had turned the steel from black to brown to rust orange.

The next day didn’t go off as well as the previous. Appalachian Sports shuttled us again down to North Caldwell where we started off in sunshine. This section of trail has less interesting points of interest and so we saw fewer folks out and about. We had lunch on a large boulder along the river.
Once we were back on the trail it began to sprinkle. That’s easy enough to handle, except the sprinkle turned into steady rain, which turned into a downpour at times. We did not bring raingear, as we trusted the faulty reports given by the Weather Channel, stating only cloudy weather.

Needless to say we pushed on, pedaling fast at times to keep ourselves warm. Droop Mountain Tunnel gave us a bit of respite from the rain for about 15 minutes. By then we had started to cool down and needed to speed ahead to keep the chill off. We finished our 44-mile slog covered in mud from the waist down, but a hot shower helped us forget our troubles. A warm filling supper in Marlinton let us sleep like babies in our tents while the rain played on.

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Greenbrier River Trail Photos

Trail Information

Greenbrier County
Nearby City
Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Accessibility
Gravel
Surface
Easy
Skill Level
Swimming, Hunting, Fishing, Camping
Additional Use
Greenbrier River Rail Trail State Park, (304) 799-7416 or www.greenbrierrail trailstatepark.com
Local Contacts
Greenbrier River Trail map and trail guide; a downloadable map at http://wordpress greenbrierrivertrail.com/trail-map/; USGS quads: Cass, Cloverlick, Edray, Marlinton
Local Maps

Trail Log