Spray Park Trail

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Distance7.5mi
Elevation Gain7,028ft
Trailhead Elevation4,824ft
Top6,384ft
Elevation Min/Max3198/6384ft
Elevation Start/End4824/4824ft

Spray Park Trail

Spray Park Trail is a hiking trail in Pierce County, Washington. It is within Mount Rainier National Park. It is 7.5 miles long and begins at 4,824 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 15.6 miles with a total elevation gain of 7,028 feet. The Cataract Valley Camp and Eagle's Roost Camp sites and the Eagle Cliff Viewpoint can be seen along the trail. There is also a wetland along the trail. Near the end of the trail are restrooms. This trail connects with the following: Wonderland Trail and Spray Falls Spur.

Spray Park Trail Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

Hiking Waterfalls in Washington (Falcon Guides)
Roddy Scheer with Adam Sawyer
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"Spray Falls is one of the most impressive natural spectacles in Washington State as it cascades 354 feet down an andesite wall and spreads out as wide as 100 feet across by the time it reaches its base and diffuses across a wide and rocky boulder- filled gorge. The short hike to get there is well worth a couple of hours, and adventurers can tack on a visit to Spray Park a mile beyond the falls to see nearby Mt. Rainier reflected in tarns and dressed up in wildflowers." Read more
Best Wildflower Hikes Western Washington (Falcon Guides)
Peter Stekel
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"It feels impossible to find an unpopular or uncrowded hike in Mount Rainier National Park. The secret is to discover a trailhead that’s either difficult to reach or is reachable only by an unpaved road. Access to Spray Park fits both those criteria, yet there are still plenty of people willing to try. That probably has everything to do with fantastic wildflowers and a view of “The Mountain” that is so close, you feel you could touch it." Read more
Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition (Falcon Guides)
Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset
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"This hike travels over several small ridges through beautiful forest to striking Spray Falls, which provides tired hikers with a nice misting on hot summer days. This hike has no significant elevation gain, but it trundles over rolling hills all the way to Spray Falls. A trail construction crew named Spray Falls in 1883 because they felt that the cascading falls broke “into a mass of spray.” The well-maintained, heavily used trail winds through beautiful forest. Expect to see many other park visitors; please reduce your impact by staying on the trail. The falls drop roughly 300 feet." Read more
Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition (Falcon Guides)
Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset
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"A short, but steep hike takes you through beautiful forest and to a subalpine meadow dotted with colorful wildflowers. The open meadows of Spray Park provide spectacular views of Mount Rainier and Mother Mountain. The Spray Park Trail is very popular due to the amazing views of Mount Rainier available from Spray Park.Views of Mother Mountain, Mount Pleasant, and Hessong Rock also bedazzle you, while hoary marmots and lupine fill the rocky meadows of Spray Park.The first 1.9 miles of the trail dip and climb over rolling hills; the trail then heads uphill all the way to the end of Spray Park." Read more
Best Hikes with Kids: Western Washington & the Cascades (The Mountaineers Books)
Joan Burton
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"Some of the most exquisite flower meadows on the north side of Mount Rainier National Park can be attained for a small expenditure of energy. Views of “The Mountain” above fields of avalanche lilies here are unforgettable. Though there is no camping in Spray Park, families can camp in the woods at Eagle’s Roost and then do the higher day trips above." Read more
60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Seattle - Including Bellevue, Everett, and Tacoma (Menasha Ridge Press)
Andrew Weber and Bryce Stevens
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"This deservedly popular hike finds its way on a moderate walk through the woods to one of the highest and most beautiful waterfalls in the state of Washington—or anywhere else, for that matter. Past the falls, a challenging 600-foot ascent in the next 0.5 mile leads to majestic Spray Park, a vast subalpine meadow on Mount Rainier’s northwest flank. In the spring, the meadow is a sea of wildflowers, complementing the wide views of the mountain and the surrounding landscape." Read more
Best Easy Day Hikes: Mount Rainier National Park (Falcon Guides)
Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset
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"This hike travels over several small ridges through beautiful forest to striking Spray Falls, which provides tired hikers with a nice misting on hot summer days. A trail construction crew named Spray Falls in 1883 because they felt that the cascading falls broke “into a mass of spray.”The well-maintained, heavily used trail winds through beautiful forest. Expect to see many other park visitors; please reduce your impact by staying on the trail. Head to the south end of Mowich Lake, past the restrooms and Mowich Lake Campground to the Wonderland Trail." Read more
Day Hiking: Mount Rainier National Park (The Mountaineers Books)
Dan A. Nelson & Alan L. Bauer
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"In many ways, you never recover from your first walk into Spray Park. The trail isn’t difficult to follow. It’s just difficult to forget. The 3.5mile walk leads to seemingly endless open meadows of heather and alpine blossoms that tease the nose, ease the mind, and tickle the imagination. The place is a virtual lily factory. The so-called park itself—actually a vast corridor of open meadows interspersed among rocky moraines, lingering snow patches, whistling marmots, and sun-basking hikers—is a wonder to behold in the summer, truly qualifying as one of Rainier’s most magnificent day-hike destinations." Read more
100 Classic Hikes Washington (The Mountaineers Books)
Craig Romano
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"Ancient cathedral forests, silver strands of cascading waters, the snout of a massive glacier, fields of dazzling wildflowers, parklands teeming with deer, bears, and marmots, and stunning, in-your-face views of The Mountain re?ected in pretty alpine pools: this classic loop captures the very essence of Mount Rainier National Park and what makes it so special! If this loop’s mileage and vertical gain are a little too much for you, or you just need a quick and easy Mount Rainier fix, head straight for Spray Park." Read more

Spray Park Trail Reviews

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7/7/2013
Amazing to see snow at the Mowich lake Campground in (still) 70F degree weather. :-)

In any event, I wanted to get out to the Mowich Lake area, especially since they just opened the road (WA-165) on 4 July. It was a gorgeous day yesterday, and even though it was hazy further out towards the South Sound, it was nice & clear in the park, and views of Mount Rainier were brilliant from Eagle's Roost, and the sunlight dnaced off of the spray at Spray Falls. The Spray Park trail was relatively clear and dry, for the most part.

Not much foot traffic, considering, but expect that to change later in the season.

All-in-all, it was an excellent day!
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8/25/2010
Went for a hike with my 8 year old at Mowich Lake in Mount Rainer national park earlier in the year, this is now probably my favorite place for taking kids hiking and camping.
Make sure that you get to the campground early to get a good spot, it is marked as a primitive camping ground and the spots fill up fast. Lots of day hikers use the trailheads to start off for day trips to Spray Falls and the ridge trail. The walk down past the lake from the campground is about a mile and is easy and fun for little ones. The lake is shallow (6in - 1.5 ft.) out to 10 - 20 feet then drops off a bit, the water is really nice and great for soaking in after coming back from a longer hike. Wrapping around the NE side of the lake and past the ranger station will lead you to a little trail that goes uphill and if you follow it up about 1 mile then get off the trail to the right you can find your way to a small meadow. There are lots of frogs here and you can spend an hour with kids watching and catching them.
Head back to camp and grab a day pack to follow the trail to Spray Falls, is trail has some elevation gain and loss but is a fun hike for 6-10 year olds and will leave them feeling like they got some good miles in. The total distance in and out is 6 miles and along the way you will walk through old growth trees and along rock shale. At about 2 miles in there is a great overlook that will give you a good chance to get some great pictures and video of Mount Rainer, continue to follow the trail up to Spray Falls and sit to have lunch and enjoy the view and cool water before heading back to camp.
So if you are looking at getting kids or the whole family out in the woods I would suggest Mowich Lake as a great spot. Go in late July and August and enjoy good trails and playing in the water.
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9/12/2009
On a cloudless day, temperatures in the low 80s at the park entrance, our trek began at the Tolmie Peak trailhead on the westernmost point of Mowich Lake. We worked our way around the serene shoreline, pausing often to admire the striking array of blues and greens displayed by the various depths. We cut across to the Spray Park trailhead behind the campground. For the first mile on the trail, we were delighted to find a half dozen varieties of edible berries in a choice of degrees of ripeness including blueberry, huckleberry, and thimbleberry. The trail itself is a stunning interplay of dense old-growth forest, dramatic cliff walls, thick heather fields, lush mountain meadows and marshes, punctuated by a half dozen quaint mountain stream crossings. There are three spurs well worth the diversion including the falls viewpoint. A well-spent effort will bring you up a pumice scramble to the base of the falls, where thin sheets of water roll off the towering knob into shallow pools. The dazzling expanse of meadow blooms at the park were the crowning jewel of our jaunt.
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8/13/2006
Great hike the falls are great,flower were also great,saw a monster buck at least a 5x5 and a huge brown bear.veiws are the best
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7/1/2006
Spectacular!

Really can't say enough good things about this hike. Walking down a snow-bank to look at Mowich Lake at the start. When approaching the Spray Falls view point, the falls appears to be literally starting out of nowhere.

After you're done looking at the falls, take the Wonderland Trail up to the Alpine meadow -- fields of wildflowers.

It doesn't get any better than this!
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10/2/2004
I have seen many waterfalls in Washington and this ranks near the top. Wide, tall, and evenly distributed, this falls is impressive. Along the way you get a stellar view of Mount Rainier up the Ptarmigan Ridge from a cliff-top resting spot. Car camping is popular at the trailhead.
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9/12/2002
Spray Park is definitely one of our favorite Mowich entrance hikes! This is the hike to do in the height of summer to enjoy the beautiful flowering meadows. Gorgeous views of Rainier all along the hike as well. Don''t forget your camera!
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Spray Park Trail Photos

Trail Information

Mount Rainier National Park
Nearby City
Mount Rainier National Park
Parks
Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Accessibility
Moderate to Difficult
Skill Level
Camping
Additional Use
Views, Waterfalls, Wildflowers
Features
Carbon River Ranger Station, (360) 829-9639
Local Contacts

Activity Feed

Dec 2018