Twin Falls Trail

Iron Horse State Park, Washington

Distance1.9mi
Elevation Gain1,801ft
Trailhead Elevation610ft
Top1,344ft
Elevation Min/Max600/1344ft
Elevation Start/End610/610ft

Twin Falls Trail

Twin Falls Trail is a hiking trail in King County, Washington. It is within Olallie State Park and Iron Horse State Park. It is 1.9 miles long and begins at 610 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 3.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,801 feet. The Olallie State Park Twin Falls Trailhead parking is near the trailhead. There are also restrooms. The Upper Twin Falls attraction can be seen along the trail. This trail connects with the following: Lower Twin Falls Viewpoint and John Wayne Pioneer Trail.

Twin Falls Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"A dramatic series of waterfalls along the South Fork Snoqualmie River, a high bridge over an impressive gorge, and an observation deck aerie are the biggest draws for hiking the Twin Falls Trail.

It’s a popular route, especially from the west trailhead, but beginning from the east allows hikers to appreciate a short section of the old Milwaukee Railroad grade and views both up and down the Snoqualmie Valley. Though the trail is wide below the falls, there are no passing lanes. Solitude seekers are advised to begin at the east trailhead, where few venture. Twin Falls is not the only allure to this trail. Anglers will find plenty of waytrails down to the river below the falls."

"The pretty little trail that weaves through the state-owned natural area presents you with up-close and personal contact with massive old-growth trees, gives you access to the sparkling river, and offers up stunning views of the thundering waterfalls—both the towering 150-foot lower falls and the stair-stepped upper falls."

"Twin Falls run year-round for one very good reason: the area around North Bend receives more than 90 inches of rain each year. Seattle—just 35 miles west—gets half that much. The South Fork Snoqualmie River takes that massive amount of rainfall and puts it to use entertaining hikers.

The river squeezes into a narrow rocky gorge before tumbling over a very impressive stairstep falls. Then, when the water has been churned into a frothy torrent, it plunges over a 150-foot rock wall, creating the stunning cascade of the Lower Twin Falls."

"Twin Falls might be the most popular waterfall hike in Washington State given its proximity to Seattle—but don’t let that deter you. The mile- long hike in takes you through a verdant temperate rain- forest gorge where fire- scarred old- growth Douglas fir trees and school bus–size glacial erratic boulders compete for your attention before the views start opening up of Twin Falls in all of its multitiered glory as it cuts through a gorge in the South Fork Snoqualmie River.

Start out from the marked trailhead on the east side of the Twin Falls parking area where SE 159th Street dead-ends and head southeast on the trail into the forest, with views of the rushing South Fork Snoqualmie River through the trees to the right (west). After a third of a mile look for a short, unmarked spur trail to the right (west) that leads down to a placid stretch of the river—a great place to take a dip on a hot day. Back on the main trail, keep heading south, passing huge glacial erratic boulders and fire- scarred old growth Douglas fi r trees. Zig- zag up a pair of switchbacks and stop at a man-made bench on a natural shelf with views east into the gorge and the lower, tallest section of Twin Falls, which free-falls 135 feet from an upper ledge into a small turbulent pool below."

"Some hikes are extraordinary for the beauty of the terrain they cross and some for the reward at the end of the trail. The Twin Falls Trail is extraordinary for both. The trail follows the South Fork of the Snoqualmie, passes through old-growth forest, and reaches two breathtaking waterfalls, one above the other.

Twin Falls is accessible from two trailheads, one above the falls and one below. Both are within the boundaries of Olallie State Park, although the lower trailhead has signs indicating it is Twin Falls State Park. According to the Washington State Park map, the lower trailhead and falls are within the Twin Falls Natural Area, a portion of Olallie State Park. The route described here starts at the lower trailhead, which begins along the bank of the rushing Snoqualmie River, its icy waters fresh from the peaks above Snoqualmie Pass. The trail winds its way through a grove of giant maples, their trunks and branches thickly coated with pads of moss and spiked with ferns, making this spot an oasis of green even in winter."

"This Washington State Parks trail was rebuilt in late 1989, as compensation for a new hydroelectric project, the Weeks Falls Power Plant, farther up the river. The walk through magnificent old-growth forest leads to views of two South Fork Snoqualmie River waterfalls.

Children will love everything about this hike: the moss-covered nurse logs, the enormous cedar and fir trees, the panoramic view at waterfall level from a viewing platform, and the bridge crossing over and between two waterfalls. The wonder of falling water forming into spray, dropping, dropping, and then becoming river again holds timeless fascination for children of all ages."

"Located well below 2,000 feet and just off I-90, Twin Falls makes a great year-round destination, especially when winter snows close many of the hikes farther up toward Snoqualmie Pass.

This hike follows the rocky south fork of the Snoqualmie River and climbs to two significant waterfalls before connecting to a larger network of trails exploring Olallie State Park."

Twin Falls Trail Reviews

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8/19/2018
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7/14/2018
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7/12/2018
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7/12/2018
An easy hike (with some uphill) in the foothills of the Cascades to a beautiful set of waterfalls. The trail gets pretty busy, so if you are seeking any kind of solitude it's probably best to get there early in the AM or on a weekday. The views of the falls and river are so beautiful.
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6/2/2018
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3/12/2018
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7/18/2010
This was a nice hike up to the falls. It was well populated with kids and dogs but for a nice Sunday, was expected. After the falls, the trail leads to the freeway noise and a power plant. Not worth going further unless you want less traffic and don't mind the freeway below.
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6/5/2010
Great trail for kids & beginners (like me). We went up on a sunny Saturday and it was very relaxing & the falls were impressive. Lots of cars & people on a nice weekend day.
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6/13/2009
Nicely maintained trail up to the falls was pretty easy. Good trail for dogs and kids. Footbridge at falls makes for great viewing. The hike beyond the falls is unremarkable and simply connects to the John Wayne Trail which is better accessed from Cedar Falls. You can expect to run into lots of other people and you're never out of earshot of I-90 traffic. There are many better trails to be had.
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2/1/2009
Not at all crowded, at least in February, and an easy short hike on a well-maintained trail to nice views of the falls.
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Trail Information

Iron Horse State Park
Nearby City
Iron Horse State Park
Parks
Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Accessibility
Moderate
Skill Level
Waterfalls
Features
Olallie State Park, Washington State Parks
Local Contacts
DeLorme Washington Atlas & Gazetteer: Page 61 6A
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Oct 2018