Tucannon River Valley

Dayton, Washington

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As one of the least-birded areas of the state, the Blue Mountains hold a lot of potential for bird-watchers willing to explore interesting habitat on their own. The Tucannon River Valley offers a good introduction to the Blue Mountains and its island of relatively damp, mountainous habitat in the far southeastern corner of the state. The habitat transitions from farm fields and gently rolling hills near U.S. Highway 12 to a riparian and then mountain-riparian area as the road follows the river into the heart of the mountains and into the William Wooten Wildlife Area. Throw in a few small lakes and ponds and the mixed-coniferous forest and you find a lot of birding potential here. Habitats: Cliffs, mountain riparian, lowland riparian, wetland, freshwater marsh, mixed-coniferous forest. Specialty birds: Bald and Golden Eagles; northern Goshawk; Swainson’s Hawk; Chukar; Northern Pygmy- and Short-eared Owls; Vaux’s Swift; Black-chinned, Calliope, and Rufous Hummingbirds; Red-naped Sapsucker; Hammond’s, Dusky, and Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Cordilleran type); Cassin’s Vireo; Gray Jay; Western Bluebird; Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch; Pine Grosbeak.

Tucannon River Valley Professional Review and Guide

"As one of the least-birded areas of the state, the Blue Mountains hold a lot of potential for bird-watchers willing to explore interesting habitat on their own. The Tucannon River Valley offers a good introduction to the Blue Mountains and its island of relatively damp, mountainous habitat in the far southeastern corner of the state. The habitat transitions from farm fields and gently rolling hills near U.S. Highway 12 to a riparian and then mountain-riparian area as the road follows the river into the heart of the mountains and into the William Wooten Wildlife Area.

Throw in a few small lakes and ponds and the mixed-coniferous forest and you find a lot of birding potential here. Habitats: Cliffs, mountain riparian, lowland riparian, wetland, freshwater marsh, mixed-coniferous forest. Specialty birds: Bald and Golden Eagles; northern Goshawk; Swainson’s Hawk; Chukar; Northern Pygmy- and Short-eared Owls; Vaux’s Swift; Black-chinned, Calliope, and Rufous Hummingbirds; Red-naped Sapsucker; Hammond’s, Dusky, and Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Cordilleran type); Cassin’s Vireo; Gray Jay; Western Bluebird; Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch; Pine Grosbeak."

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Dayton
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best summer and fall
Trailhead Elevation: 1,400 feet
Top Elevation: feet
Local Contacts: Wooten Wildlife Area
Driving Directions: Directions to Tucannon River Valley

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May 2018