Tucannon River Canyon Camp Wooten

Dayton, Washington

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The Tucannon River Canyon is a transition zone, from the sagelands of the lower river to the dry pine forests of the Blue Mountains at the upper end of the canyon. The Tucannon is a blue-ribbon trout stream popular with anglers of all kinds. Humans, of course, fish here, but so do kingfishers, bald eagles, falcons, raccoons, black bears, and river otters. The area around the Wooten Wildlife Area straddles the prime transition zone, with high, dry bluffs and desert prairies bounded by ponderosa pine forests. Camp Wooten is a popular recreation camp used by local 4-H and other youth groups.
Best Desert Hikes Washington

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Best Desert Hikes Washington

by Alan L. Bauer & Dan A. Nelson (The Mountaineers Books)

The Tucannon River Canyon is a transition zone, from the sagelands of the lower river to the dry pine forests of the Blue Mountains at the upper end of the canyon. The Tucannon is a blue-ribbon trout stream popular with anglers of all kinds. Humans, of course, fish here, but so do kingfishers, bald eagles, falcons, raccoons, black bears, and river otters.

The area around the Wooten Wildlife Area straddles the prime transition zone, with high, dry bluffs and desert prairies bounded by ponderosa pine forests. Camp Wooten is a popular recreation camp used by local 4-H and other youth groups.

©  Alan L. Bauer & Dan A. Nelson/The Mountaineers Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Dayton
Distance: 6
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 2 to 4 hours
Season: Year-round
Trailhead Elevation: 650 feet
Top Elevation: 1,287 feet
Local Contacts: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Local Maps: Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Clarkston
Driving Directions: Directions to Tucannon River Canyon (Camp Wooten)

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May 2018