Dutch Gap Trails

Dutch Gap Historical Park, Virginia

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Dutch Gap Trails is a hiking trail in Chesterfield County, Virginia. It is within Dutch Gap Historical Park. It is 0.9 miles long and begins at 32 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.8 miles with a total elevation gain of 80 feet. The Dutch Gap Marina Parking is near the trailhead.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Dutch Gap Trails is a hiking trail in Chesterfield County, Virginia. It is within Dutch Gap Historical Park. It is 0.9 miles long and begins at 32 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.8 miles with a total elevation gain of 80 feet. The Dutch Gap Marina Parking is near the trailhead.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Dutch Gap Historical Park
Distance: 0.9
Elevation Gain: 80 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 32 feet
Top Elevation: 32 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Dutch Gap Trails
Parks: Dutch Gap Historical Park
Elevation Min/Max: 4/32 ft
Elevation Start/End: 32/32 ft

Dutch Gap Trails Professional Reviews and Guides

"This preserved wildland near the famous re-created Henricus Village of the 1600s offers a big loop hike where you can become one with the wetlands along the James River in lower Chesterfield County, and visit the village. In its current incarnation, Dutch Gap is a conservation area of over 800 acres, covering lands and waters of the old James River channel where wildlife thrives.

Long ago, English colonists settled in the area, forming Henricus, a community around which a defensive ditch was built. The moat became known as the Dutch Gap. Fast forward: As commercial traffic increased on the James River, a canal was cut across a loop in the James, forming a big oxbow lake. Later, the interior of the oxbow was mined for sand and gravel."

"The 810-acre Dutch Gap Conservation Area abuts Henricus Historical Park (see page 70), site of an English settlement just four years younger than Jamestown. The area’s present topography bears the scars of four centuries of human manipulation, beginning with the moat-building project for which it was named.

Yet nature persists undaunted, and this hike, which traces a tidal inlet of the James that was formerly an oxbow bend in the river, affords you the chance to escape civilization into a marsh teeming with wildlife."

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May 2018