Bear Trail

Bear Lake State Park, Utah

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Bear Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Rich County, Utah. It is within Bear Lake State Park. It is 4.6 miles long and begins at 5,943 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 9.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 132 feet. The Koa Campground camp site can be seen along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Bear Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Rich County, Utah. It is within Bear Lake State Park. It is 4.6 miles long and begins at 5,943 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 9.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 132 feet. The Koa Campground camp site can be seen along the trail.
Activity Type: Fishing, Hiking, Road Biking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Bear Lake State Park
Distance: 4.6
Elevation Gain: 132 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 5,943 feet
Top Elevation: 5,967 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Bear Trail
Parks: Bear Lake State Park
Elevation Min/Max: 5937/5967 ft
Elevation Start/End: 5943/5943 ft

Bear Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"The Bear Lake Cruise is a 51-mile lap of Bear Lake; the preferred direction is clockwise, such that the rider remains on the lake side of the road. The ride uses US 89 and SR 30 on the western side of the lake, and Eastshore Road (in Idaho) and Cisco Road"

"Bear Lake is a natural body of water straddling the Utah-Idaho border in the northeastern corner of the state. As Utah’s second-largest freshwater lake at 20 miles long and 8 miles wide, there is plenty of room for waterskiing, swimming, scuba diving, and sailing on or below its breathtakingly blue surface. Three state-owned facilities provide boating, camping, and picnicking. Key Species: Cutthroat trout, lake trout, Bonneville cisco, and whitefish.

In the winter,snowmobilers and ice anglers are drawn to the area. However, the lake doesn’t always freeze. Bear Lake is famous for it's annual January cisco run. Bear Lake cutthroat are quite predacious, so biologists have stocked them in
lakes and reservoirs across the state hoping they will help control nongame fish."

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May 2018