Smith Morehouse Trail

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Utah

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1 Review
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Smith Morehouse Trail is a hiking trail in Summit County, Utah. It is within Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. It is 5.6 miles long and begins at 7,774 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 11.3 miles with a total elevation gain of 2,716 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Smith Morehouse Trail is a hiking trail in Summit County, Utah. It is within Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. It is 5.6 miles long and begins at 7,774 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 11.3 miles with a total elevation gain of 2,716 feet. This trail connects with the following: Lakes Country Trail.
Activity Type: Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding, Backpacking, Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
Distance: 5.6
Elevation Gain: 2,716 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 7,774 feet
Top Elevation: 10,367 feet
Additional Use: Snowmobiling, Camping
Parks: Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
Elevation Min/Max: 7771/10367 ft
Elevation Start/End: 7774/7774 ft

Smith Morehouse Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"Thinning forest, lush green meadows, tiny brooklets of crystal clear water (always filter), white rock outcroppings, and a few small lakes grace the saddle area along the trail. We recommend camping off-trail at one of the lakes in the saddle.

From your camp you can make side trips to Island and Big Elk Lakes. Island Lake lies about 1 mile south on the main trail. To reach Big Elk Lake watch for a trail sign just before dropping off the south side of the saddle. The sign indicates the path going west, crossing behind the peak on the west side of the saddle. The trail to Big Elk Lake is faint, but well cairned."

"Smith and Morehouse Reservoir is a beautiful place nestled into the western edge
of the Uintas, where ice fishermen, snowmobilers, and Nordic skiers can be found
recreating. You might even get lucky and run into a sled dog tour on Forest Road 33 on your way to the mountains north of the lake. These steep, forested slopes are the
closest skiing from the trailhead and rise up to a broad ridge, terminating at Point
10002. Shoulders, gullies, and numerous terrain traps guard some challenging tree
skiing, but avalanches are a huge concern here, so be confident of slope stability
before setting off on the skin track. Also, everything north of national forest land is
private property, so take care not to trespass."

"The Smith and Morehouse Trail offers a simple forested walk close to a vibrant creek. Rocky at times, it offers water, shade, horse trails, and views of the steep walls enveloping Smith and Morehouse Creek. Dogs love the cool shade of this hike and the diversity of wildlife that gives the area a delicious perfume. Since the trail begins and ends at a busy campground, anticipate sharing it with horses and hikers."

Smith Morehouse Trail Reviews

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6/17/2003
I have just returned from hiking the Smith and Morehouse trial all the way to Island Lake. It is on of my favorite trials to backpack on. I like it so much that I return at least every year and do it again. For most of the hike it is an easy slow sloped hill, but you will come to a few steep parts. My favorite thing to do is camp by the river the follows the the trail for almost the whole way, it is good fishing. Every time I go I see a lot of wild game along the trail, like moose, deer and even a few elk. Also along the trial about a half hour walk is a nice Beaver dam. As you will near the top of the trail you can view the lake, it is beautiful almost at tree line the lake sits neastled at the bottom of a huge boulder mountain and this early in the year there is almost always snow the comes down the mountain almost to the the lake. This trail should be hike by all outdoor lovers! Its a good one!
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Jun 2018