San Angelo State Park Trails

San Angelo, Texas

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4 Reviews
5 out of 5
I’ve met the guy who built a lot of this. I always wanted to come here and ride it. Friends had told me I would need to carry a GPS unit. I made grunting sounds, totally convinced my near Apache-like sense of direction would see me through. Then, about five miles into the ride, it got completely cloudy. That GPS I didn’t have was making snotty little remarks in my head, and it took about ten minutes for me to remember I had my compass in my pack. And then all my old Boy Scout bravado came back to me and I found my way. But if you don’t know your way, this place can scare you. There are miles and miles and miles of single-track going in several different directions. But there’s no need for terror; you’re riding in an area that used to be old parks when O.C. Fisher Lake once had water in it. You’re essentially going to ride along a strip of land that is probably no more than a couple of miles wide (east to west) and about ten miles long (north to south). There are many old ruined picnic tables around and even a few parks that may still be active (for equestrian use, I believe).

San Angelo State Park Trails Professional Review and Guide

"I’ve met the guy who built a lot of this. I always wanted to come here and ride it. Friends had told me I would need to carry a GPS unit. I made grunting sounds, totally convinced my near Apache-like sense of direction would see me through. Then, about five miles into the ride, it got completely cloudy. That GPS I didn’t have was making snotty little remarks in my head, and it took about ten minutes for me to remember I had my compass in my pack. And then all my old Boy Scout bravado came back to me and I found my way. But if you don’t know your way, this place can scare you.

There are miles and miles and miles of single-track going in several different directions. But there’s no need for terror; you’re riding in an area that used to be old parks when O.C. Fisher Lake once had water in it. You’re essentially going to ride along a strip of land that is probably no more than a couple of miles wide (east to west) and about ten miles long (north to south). There are many old ruined picnic tables around and even a few parks that may still be active (for equestrian use, I believe)."

Activity Type: Mountain Biking
Nearby City: San Angelo
Distance: 30
Elevation Gain: 100 feet
Trail Type: Several options
Technical Difficulty: Easy to Difficult
Physical Difficulty: Easy to Difficult
Season: Year-round, except after rain; hot in summer
Trailhead Elevation: 1,900 feet
Top Elevation: 2,000 feet
Local Contacts: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
Driving Directions: Directions to San Angelo State Park Trails

Recent Trail Reviews

2/22/2009
0

Summary: I ride out here weekly. Excellent endurance trail. About 65% easy flat, 25% light to moderate climbing & descending, and 10% short but steep & technical climbing & descending, such as Roller Coaster. Lots of baby heads and all sorts of cactus and other things waiting to take a bite out of you and your tires. There are several water fountains throughout the ride, but bring lots of water, especially in summer. Basic loop is about 26 miles, but there are many shorter options. Print out the map at http://www.friendsofsasp.com/Map1.html It is the best available map. Watch for rattlesnakes beginning in March through October or so. Recommended Route: I start at the north entrance as Bell's trailhead and head about 14 miles to the South end of the park, and have lunch. Then hop on Chaparral Trail and head back to the North end of the Park, about a 12 mile return trip. It is easy to feel lost out here (hard to actually get lost) the first couple of times, but all trails eventually run North and South to either end of the park. So when lost, just pick a trail and stick with it. I'm an intermediate level rider and it takes me about 3 hours of actual saddle time to complete the 26 mile loop. Lunch and water breaks add in another hour. Other recommended trails in the same area: Buck Creek Trail in Abilene is a nice 12 mile loop. It has several technical features that challenge the intermediate rider and keep things somewhat interesting for the advanced rider. Like all trails in this part of Texas: lots of rock and cactus.


2/6/2003
0

Great trails. It is one of the few places that let you feel like you are on an expedition instead of a scripted loop. Fast and curvy sections with other areas that are steep and difficult. It is a great mix of everything. Just get out there and ride it!


6/27/2002
0

Turkey Mountain is the best trail in available in the Tulsa Metro area. I must say that there are several different degrees of difficulty all throughout the "mtn". Small Rocks, Large Rocks, Dirt, & Sand. There are 3 or 4 ponds on the property which makes for nice scenery as well as some really great single track. Not recommended that you ride after a rain.


10/5/2000
0

best trails i have ever been on



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May 2018