Boca Chica

Port Isabel, Texas

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0 out of 5
Boca is Spanish for “mouth,” as in the mouth of the Rio Grande, which reaches the Gulf of Mexico about 18 miles east of Brownsville. At times, that is, the river actually reaches the Gulf. So depleted is its water by human uses that occasionally the flow simply pools up in the sands of Boca Chica beach. The drive east along Texas Highway 4 is often a solitary one, through mostly undeveloped grassy flats. It’s worth making the trip, in fact, just to see such an unspoiled expanse of the Rio Grande Valley. Some of the land in the area has been acquired by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as one of the many disjunct tracts of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge.
Exploring the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Exploring the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

by Mel White (Falcon Guides)

Boca is Spanish for “mouth,” as in the mouth of the Rio Grande, which reaches the Gulf of Mexico about 18 miles east of Brownsville. At times, that is, the river actually reaches the Gulf. So depleted is its water by human uses that occasionally the flow simply pools up in the sands of Boca Chica beach.

The drive east along Texas Highway 4 is often a solitary one, through mostly undeveloped grassy flats. It’s worth making the trip, in fact, just to see such an unspoiled expanse of the Rio Grande Valley. Some of the land in the area has been acquired by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as one of the many disjunct tracts of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

©  Mel White/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Port Isabel
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Year-round; best in spring, winter also good
Local Contacts: Lower Rio Grande Valley Wildlife Refuge
Driving Directions: Directions to Boca Chica

Recent Trail Reviews

5/18/2006
0

Considered one of the most biologically diverse refuges in the nation, LRGV’s amazing diversity spans over 100 tracts that includes tidal flats and beaches, subtropical forests, semi-arid brushlands, and grasslands along the last 275 river miles of the Rio Grande. With over 95% of the original lower Rio Grande delta habitat cleared or altered, efforts by LRGV to preserve and restore native vegetation is critical. Reconnecting fragmented pieces of habitat is one of the primary goals of the refuge.



Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018