Hot Springs

Mariscal Mountain, Texas 79834

Hot Springs

Hot Springs Professional Guide

Detailed Trail Description from our Guidebook

"J. O. Langford and his family homesteaded here at the confluence of Tornillo Creek and the Rio Grande in 1909 and built a small health spa using hot spring waters. He also hoped to regain his health after suffering from malaria growing up in Mississippi.

With the help of a stonemason, he built a large stone bathhouse over the main hot spring. In 1913 unrest and civil war in Mexico caused the Langfords to leave the border area. In 1927 they returned and built a combined post office, trading post, and motel for guests. The Langfords finally left permanently in 1942 after selling their land to the government for inclusion in the new national park. Maggy Smith operated the resort for several more years as a park concession before it finally closed for good."

More Hot Springs Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

100 Classic Hikes in Texas (The Mountaineers Books)
E. Dan Klepper
View more trails from this guide book
"The Hot Springs area along the Rio Grande River is a prehistoric site visited by early humans thousands of years ago, a fact evident in the rock art they left behind on the limestone cliffs. Later, settlers arrived to partake of the “healing” waters. Today’s hikers may do so as well. The trailhead for this short hike is found just beyond the parking area. The trail soon passes a stone building that once housed a post office and general store that belonged to J. O. Langford. Settler Langford claimed the area in 1909 using the Homestead Act, arriving in the region for health reasons. He had contracted malaria as a child, never fully recovered, and hearing of the existence of the hot springs and their curative powers, decided to move his family West." Read more

Hot Springs Reviews

4
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
icon10 Total
5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars
3/27/2018
0
Comments
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
3/2/2011
Short but sweet trail. Along the Rio Grande...very easy. Past some historical buildings. End up at a hotspring on the Rio Grande. Take your shoes off and warm up in hot spring or cool down in Rio Grande. Last 1/2 mile scarey on road as you are on narrow shelf road ...drop not too great but would not be good for car to go off.
0
Comments
3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars
12/19/2008
The trail itself is not exactly why we did this trail--more for the Hot Springs at the end. It is pretty cool though. Very short easy hike. I believe you can do a longer hike if you come from the other side of the springs.
0
Comments
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
3/15/2008
An easy hike either from the road or the campground. Nothing fancy but remnants of what must have been a grand place at one time. We had the tub to ourselves at dusk and watched owls take bats out of the air just after sunset. Nice spot.
0
Comments
2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars
1/3/2007
Our experience was different in that heavy rains had closed the access road. We were able to hike in via Tornillo creek starting at the River Road, a muddy but able alternative route. The hot springs were harder to find among the river bank vegetation than I would have thought. Unfortunately, the recent rains must have overwhelmed the spring - for there was not even warm in the hot spring area. The humongous Palms, petroglyghs and ghost resort buildings made up for it, however.
0
Comments
5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars
2/24/2004
The hot springs can be really great or really lousy depending on the crowd. I've been fortunate. The first time I visited them was around 11:00 on a cool evening under a full moon. The pool was clean and clear, and several park employees were taking the waters 'clothing optional'. We eased in to the piping hot water and had a great time discussing the day's hikes, scenery, politics... very relaxing and very laid back.
0
Comments
0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
10/18/2002
A quick and easy hike that affords you many valuable experiences you might not otherwise have. While we are used to long, rugged hikes instead, this hike was still well worth the time. It''s a fascinating place; from the Native American pictographs & petroglyphs to the animal scat and tracks in the mud along the Rio Grande''s banks, not to mention the soothing waters of the Hot Spring itself(right at the river''s edge). We were fortunate enough to get a history lesson from one of the locals. The trail is plenty wide in most areas and very easy to follow. A variance to the trail takes you up and over to look down at the hot spring and view the river from above. This trail will circle you back into the parking area. It is worth an hour of your time.
0
Comments
2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars
11/30/2001
The trail is short and scenic as it approaches the hot springs. You'll see old resort buildings, indian pictographs, giant cottonwoods, and a cool river cliff area. Unfortunately when I visited, the springs were full of obese folks whining about the hike and screaming kids. Granted I visited on Thanksgiving Saturday, so it was probably one of the worst times of the year for a relaxing hot springs experience. It is a nice area, often cluttered with trash, that would be great on a cool winter night in the middle of the winter.
0
Comments
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
11/9/2001
The Hot Spring is a great place to enjoy the bright stars of the West Texas sky. With a short easy hike past Indian pictographs and buildings left from settlers and more recently, hippies we found a great place to end a day of hiking and mountain biking. This is an easy hike for the entire family. During busy seasons, you may find that the spring is full of other people with the same idea of relaxing. Once, during Spring Break we were surprised by the annoyance of loud music from a college kid that seem to miss the point in visiting a place like Big Bend. Remember, people go there to get away from the noise.
0
Comments
5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars5 out of 5 stars
6/16/2001
If you go to Big Bend,you must experience the Hot Springs trail. Hot water bubbling up out of the Rio Grand river. Great!
0
Comments

Hot Springs Photos

Trail Information

Mariscal Mountain
Nearby City
1
Distance
Loop/Lollipop
Trail Type
Easy
Skill Level
30 minutes
Duration
Year-round
Season
Big Bend National Park
Local Contacts

Activity Feed

Dec 2018