Lake Tawakoni

Greenville, Texas

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1 Review
4 out of 5
The 36,700-acre Lake Tawakoni, one of the state’s larger manmade reservoirs, is one of the two Sabine River Authority impoundments on the main stem of the Sabine River. The river begins in north-central Texas and eventually flows into the Gulf of Mexico near Orange. Iron Bridge Dam, including the spillway, is 5.5 miles long; access is available on weekdays from 8 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Lake Tawakoni State Park, located on the south shore off SH 2475, is in the development stage. Nearby Wills Point, advertised as the bluebird capital of America, sponsors an annual Bluebird Festival the second weekend of April. Key birds: Wood and Mottled Ducks, Crested Caracara, Greater Roadrunner, and Pileated Woodpecker are present year-round. Wood Stork, Chuck-will’s-widow, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Prothonotary and Kentucky Warblers, Louisiana Waterthrush, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. Pacific and Common Loons; Bald Eagle; American Woodcock; Sprague’s Pipit; Sedge Wren; Fox, LeConte’s, and Harris’s Sparrows; and Lapland and Smith’s Longspurs can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.
Birding Texas

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Birding Texas

by Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger (Falcon Guides)

The 36,700-acre Lake Tawakoni, one of the state’s larger manmade reservoirs, is one of the two Sabine River Authority impoundments on the main stem of the Sabine River. The river begins in north-central Texas and eventually flows into the Gulf of Mexico near Orange. Iron Bridge Dam, including the spillway, is 5.5 miles long; access is available on weekdays from 8 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Lake Tawakoni State Park, located on the south shore off SH 2475, is in the development stage. Nearby Wills Point, advertised as the bluebird capital of America, sponsors an annual Bluebird Festival the second weekend of April.

Key birds: Wood and Mottled Ducks, Crested Caracara, Greater Roadrunner, and Pileated Woodpecker are present year-round. Wood Stork, Chuck-will’s-widow, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Prothonotary and Kentucky Warblers, Louisiana Waterthrush, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. Pacific and Common Loons; Bald Eagle; American Woodcock; Sprague’s Pipit; Sedge Wren; Fox, LeConte’s, and Harris’s Sparrows; and Lapland and Smith’s Longspurs can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

©  Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Greenville
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best Late April to-May for migrants, late summer for post-nesting wanderers, & late November to early February for Smith’s Longspur & vagrants
Local Contacts: Sabine River Authority,
Local Maps: Texas Atlas & Gazetteer, DeLorme
Driving Directions: Directions to Lake Tawakoni

Recent Trail Reviews

9/29/2007
0

I walked the trail at Lake Tawakoni State Park that runs to the west of the camping areas. The route I took was probably about 6-8 miles long and took me about 2.5 hours. I wanted to do some birding, but saw very few birds. However, the trail was so nice, I just enjoyed the walk. The trail is built for mountain biking, so the head clearance is high, and the trail is wide. There were no mosquitos, which I was glad, because I forgot to bring my bug spray. The trail goes thru various vegetation areas from brush, to stands of post oaks, to cedars with various microclimates. The walk was also nice, because I felt like I had the woods to myself. I did not see a single person on the trails, even though it was a Saturday morning.



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Activity Feed

May 2018