Boquillas Canyon

Ernst Valley, Texas

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4 Reviews
4 out of 5
Boquillas means “little mouths” in Spanish. Although no one is sure where the name for the canyon originated, some believe it was named either for the canyon’s narrow entrance or for the numerous small openings, or solution holes, in its limestone walls. The Boquillas Canyon Trail is a popular short trail, appropriate for adults and children. Be aware, however, that during late spring, summer, and early fall midday temperatures frequently rise above 100°F. During the hot time of year, walks along this trail are best taken in the early-morning hours.

Boquillas Canyon Professional Review and Guide

"Boquillas means “little mouths” in Spanish. Although no one is sure where the name for the canyon originated, some believe it was named either for the canyon’s narrow entrance or for the numerous small openings, or solution holes, in its limestone walls.

The Boquillas Canyon Trail is a popular short trail, appropriate for adults and children. Be aware, however, that during late spring, summer, and early fall midday temperatures frequently rise above 100°F. During the hot time of year, walks along this trail are best taken in the early-morning hours."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Ernst Valley
Distance: 0.7
Trail Type: Shuttle
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 30 minutes
Season: Year-round
Local Contacts: Big Bend National Park
Driving Directions: Directions to Boquillas Canyon

Recent Trail Reviews

11/22/2009
0

Wonderfull trail. If you want to understand some of the history between Big Bend and the Town of Boqillas then this is a must hike. Before 9/11 hikers could hike a down and take a trip across the Rio Grande and unofficially cross into Mexico and then hire a mule or horse to ride into the Town of Boquillas and shop for Big Bend items, walking sticks and crystals, dine and drink in the cantina and mingle with the local folk. Since 9/11 all unofficial border crossings were closed and the boat captain and horse and mule renters and the Town simply dried up. Only a few remain and if your lucky you may actually get to meet Jesus and Victor (the boat captain that now sings in the canyon) who are the ones responsible for leaving the walking sticks, crystals and money bucket for us to enjoy.


12/1/2006
0

Well, it was a different experience. I always go hiking right before the sun comes up, so no different this time. I was alone at the parking lot. What was different is that the parking lot is in spitting distance to the Rio Grande and therefore Mexico. There were even signs there that informed me that there are occasional break-ins into cars which didn't make me feel good but I decided that I came here to hike and not to worry. So I started to hike and 100 yards later ran into a spot with Mexican walking sticks, necklaces, etc. laying on the group, a little note, and a money jar (empty). But no on was there. I still decided not to worry about the car. I kept on walking and 100 yards later the same thing happened. Then I heard sounds and looked around and saw two wild donkeys, a little while later I ran into 5 wild horses. They must have been from the days before 9/11 when Mexicans brought folks from the US side over to Mexico for a little shopping trip. Anyway, it was extremely beautiful and I enjoyed the wild horses that let me come up to 20 yards close to them. The canyon was great. The only thing I didn't like about this trail is that it is so extremely short. And, by the way, the car was still in one piece when I came back.


9/29/2006
0

This was recommended by a friend of a friend. Note to self: only take recommendatins from immediate friends! haha. It was OK. Overlooking the river into the now desolate town was interesting. Years ago, it was bustling with activity as the Mexicans transported the Americans over by a small boat and a burrow ride to their town. Since strict US laws prohibit the Mexicans from doing this anymore, the town has died. Somewhat picturesque.


3/7/2000
0

Great trail in the late evening. Getting up the rise at the parking lot is the steapest part of the trail. Beyond this the trail leads along the river through reed growths that are well over 10 feet. They make a nice shady tunnell. The trail ends at the river just past the snad dune cave. This is worth the effort. Get to the top, step back a few feet and fling yourself over the edge. You'll have sand en every pore by the time you reach bottom, but it's fun!! I've been doing that sand hill for 35 years. (since I was 6 on my first trip with dad)



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May 2018