Lake Amistad TX / Mexico Border

Del Rio, Texas

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1 Review
5 out of 5
Short Take: 67,000 acres; large rocky canyons but only one major tributary; widespread hydrilla. The last thing serious fishermen would expect to see in a deep, clear-water lake is hydrilla, but at Lake Amistad this fast-growing Asian weed has become widespread, and as a result, the bass fishing has improved dramatically. In fact, since it first appeared about 1994, the hydrilla has totally changed how anglers fish the 67,000-acre impoundment. Located along the Texas/Mexico border, Amistad has been often described as a blue gem in a brown desert, a description referring to the beautiful blue lake set in a semi-arid countryside characteristic of this part of Texas. In addition to the Rio Grande, the primary tributary is the Devils River. The Pecos River, also considered a tributary by some, does not flow into the major part of the lake, but rather enters the Rio Grande more than 60 miles above the dam. Several smaller creeks feed both the Rio Grande and Devils Rivers. The entire area has been designated the Amistad National Recreation Area, and is administered by the National Park Service. This means there is no residential and extremely limited commercial development along the shorelines. Primary Species: Largemouth and smallmouth bass.

Lake Amistad (TX / Mexico Border) Professional Review and Guide

"Short Take: 67,000 acres; large rocky canyons but only one major tributary; widespread hydrilla. The last thing serious fishermen would expect to see in a deep, clear-water lake is hydrilla, but at Lake Amistad this fast-growing Asian weed has become widespread, and as a result, the bass fishing has improved dramatically. In fact, since it first appeared about 1994, the hydrilla has totally changed how anglers fish the 67,000-acre impoundment. Located along the Texas/Mexico border, Amistad has been often described as a blue gem in a brown desert, a description referring to the beautiful blue lake set in a semi-arid countryside characteristic of this part of Texas. In addition to the Rio Grande, the primary tributary is the Devils River.

The Pecos River, also considered a tributary by some, does not flow into the major part of the lake, but rather enters the Rio Grande more than 60 miles above the dam. Several smaller creeks feed both the Rio Grande and Devils Rivers. The entire area has been designated the Amistad National Recreation Area, and is administered by the National Park Service. This means there is no residential and extremely limited commercial development along the shorelines. Primary Species: Largemouth and smallmouth bass."

Activity Type: Fishing
Nearby City: Del Rio
Season & Limits: Best February through April, October, November
Local Contacts: Amistad National Recreation Area
Driving Directions: Directions to Lake Amistad (TX / Mexico Border)

Recent Trail Reviews

4/20/2007
0

Miles from anything remotely civilized, you'll find Lake Amistad. This lake actually has 3 major tributaries including the Devil's, Pecos, and Rio Grande Rivers. I've spent most of my time up the Devil's River fishing around submerged trees for crappie and catfish. These trees are something amazing. I've deduced that they are gigantic Pecan trees. When the lake is at capacity, they shoot up out of the water about 15-20' from a depth of no less than 40'. The part of the tree that is out of the water is still 1 1/2' in diameter. I'm easily amused, so you can imagine the excitement that I feel when exploring the spectacular 200+' cliffs a few miles up the Devil's. The crappie fishing (weather permitting) is usually spectacular. These slabs are usually around 12-13"



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May 2018