Angelina National Forest and Sam Rayburn Reservoir

Broaddus, Texas

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Although the Angelina is the smallest national forest in Texas (154,307 acres), Sam Rayburn Reservoir is one of the largest inland lakes (114,500 acres), 50 miles long with approximately 560 miles of shoreline. Only 100 miles Northeast of Houston, the reservoir is a popular recreation area. The forest contains a scattering of bogs with pitcher plants, sundews, and sphagnum moss, which occur in hillside seeps, in places where prescribed fires occur frequently, and in a few mowed areas in road right-of-ways. Key birds: Wood Duck; Red-headed, Red-cockaded, and Pileated Woodpeckers; Brown-headed Nuthatch; and Bachman’s Sparrow are present year-round. Neotropic Cormorant; Anhinga; Roseate Spoonbill; Wood Stork; White Ibis; Chuck-will’s-widow; Scissor-tailed Flycatcher; Wood Thrush; Prothonotary, Kentucky, Swainson’s, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. American White Pelican; Bald Eagle; American Woodcock; Sedge Wren; Grasshopper, Henslow’s, and LeConte’s Sparrows; and Rusty Blackbird can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

Angelina National Forest and Sam Rayburn Reservoir Professional Review and Guide

"Although the Angelina is the smallest national forest in Texas (154,307 acres), Sam Rayburn Reservoir is one of the largest inland lakes (114,500 acres), 50 miles long with approximately 560 miles of shoreline. Only 100 miles Northeast of Houston, the reservoir is a popular recreation area. The forest contains a scattering of bogs with pitcher plants, sundews, and sphagnum moss, which occur in hillside seeps, in places where prescribed fires occur frequently, and in a few mowed areas in road right-of-ways.

Key birds: Wood Duck; Red-headed, Red-cockaded, and Pileated Woodpeckers; Brown-headed Nuthatch; and Bachman’s Sparrow are present year-round. Neotropic Cormorant; Anhinga; Roseate Spoonbill; Wood Stork; White Ibis; Chuck-will’s-widow; Scissor-tailed Flycatcher; Wood Thrush; Prothonotary, Kentucky, Swainson’s, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. American White Pelican; Bald Eagle; American Woodcock; Sedge Wren; Grasshopper, Henslow’s, and LeConte’s Sparrows; and Rusty Blackbird can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information."

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Broaddus
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best April and May for spring migrants and nesting activities; November to March for winter birds
Local Contacts: Angelina National Forest;
Local Maps: Texas Atlas & Gazetteer, DeLorme
Driving Directions: Directions to Angelina National Forest and Sam Rayburn Reservoir

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May 2018