Atlanta State Park and Wright Patman Lake

Atlanta, Texas

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1 Review
4 out of 5
The 1,474-acre state park is the largest of the many parks surrounding the reservoir. The 20,300-acre Wright Patman Lake (a conservation pool) and most of the surrounding lands are administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The earthfill dam is 18,500 feet long, with a maximum height of 100 feet, and was designed to retain floodwaters of the Sulphur River. Wright Patman Dam and Lake are named for Congressman Wright Patman. Key birds: Wood and Mottled Ducks, Red-headed and Pileated Woodpeckers, Fish Crow, and Brown-headed Nuthatch are present year-round. Anhinga; White Ibis; Mississippi Kite; Chuck-will’s-widow; Scissor-tailed Flycatcher; Wood Thrush; Yellow-throated, Prothonotary, Kentucky, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; Painted Bunting; and Dickcissel occur in summer. Surf and White-winged Scoters, Hooded and Red-breasted Mergansers, Osprey, Bald Eagle, American Woodcock, LeConte’s and Harris’s Sparrows, and Lapland Longspur can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.
Birding Texas

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Birding Texas

by Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger (Falcon Guides)

The 1,474-acre state park is the largest of the many parks surrounding the reservoir. The 20,300-acre Wright Patman Lake (a conservation pool) and most of the surrounding lands are administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The earthfill dam is 18,500 feet long, with a maximum height of 100 feet, and was designed to retain floodwaters of the Sulphur River. Wright Patman Dam and Lake are named for Congressman Wright Patman.

Key birds: Wood and Mottled Ducks, Red-headed and Pileated Woodpeckers, Fish Crow, and Brown-headed Nuthatch are present year-round. Anhinga; White Ibis; Mississippi Kite; Chuck-will’s-widow; Scissor-tailed Flycatcher; Wood Thrush; Yellow-throated, Prothonotary, Kentucky, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; Painted Bunting; and Dickcissel occur in summer. Surf and White-winged Scoters, Hooded and Red-breasted Mergansers, Osprey, Bald Eagle, American Woodcock, LeConte’s and Harris’s Sparrows, and Lapland Longspur can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

©  Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Atlanta
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best April and May for spring migrants and nesting activities; October for vagrants; November to March for winter birds
Local Contacts: Atlanta State Park
Local Maps: Texas Atlas & Gazetteer, DeLorme
Driving Directions: Directions to Atlanta State Park and Wright Patman Lake

Recent Trail Reviews

7/15/2006
0

Park: Atlanta State Park is a wonderful place for camping, fishing, hiking, nature watching, and relaxing. The hiking trail is about 4 miles in length and can be done in one day. The trail was beautiful with nice stops along the way. There were a few forks in the road so a compass and map are needed to know where you want to go. One of the turns was located near the lake so it made for a nice stop and eat place. Fishing is good in the morning and best if you take a boat in deeper water. We did not see much wildlife but the temperature was in the triple digits so the wildlife was indoors. We did see deer droppings. Personnel: Park ranger was very friendly and answered all the questions we asked and volunteered even more information. T Area: Small store a stones throw from the park where you can purchase fish bait, ice, and snacks. Park headquarters has a small store with a coke machine, t-shirs, firewood, walking sticks, maps and other items. The only thing wrong was the heat. All sites have elec and water hook ups so if you go during the summer months bring a large fan.



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May 2018