Overnight Trail at Montgomery Bell State Park

Burns, Tennessee

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3 Reviews
3 out of 5
This pleasant overnight trail takes you around the circumference of the park and past or near most of its highlights, such as the Ore Pit Loop, Lake Woodhaven, and Lake Acorn. Montgomery Bell State Park covers 3,782 acres in Dickson County. The park honors Montgomery Bell, who began a business with a furnace to process iron ore and went on to build a small empire within the county. The park is situated on top of old ore pits and even contains the remains of the Old Laurel Furnace, vintage 1815. Both the ore pits and the furnace are located along the Montgomery Bell Overnight Trail. The park has 19 miles of trail in eight trails, six of them a mile or less long. The longest one is the Montgomery Bell Overnight Trail, which winds around the periphery of the park, passing along two of the park’s three lakes and accessing three overnight shelters along the way.

Overnight Trail at Montgomery Bell State Park Professional Review and Guide

"This pleasant overnight trail takes you around the circumference of the park and past or near most of its highlights, such as the Ore Pit Loop, Lake Woodhaven, and Lake Acorn. Montgomery Bell State Park covers 3,782 acres in Dickson County. The park honors Montgomery Bell, who began a business with a furnace to process iron ore and went on to build a small empire within the county. The park is situated on top of old ore pits and even contains the remains of the Old Laurel Furnace, vintage 1815.

Both the ore pits and the furnace are located along the Montgomery Bell Overnight Trail. The park has 19 miles of trail in eight trails, six of them a mile or less long. The longest one is the Montgomery Bell Overnight Trail, which winds around the periphery of the park, passing along two of the park’s three lakes and accessing three overnight shelters along the way."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Burns
Distance: 10.5
Elevation Gain: 130 feet
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 4 to 5 hours
Season: Year-round
Trailhead Elevation: 660 feet
Top Elevation: feet
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Local Contacts: Montgomery Bell State Resort Park, 615-797-9052
Local Maps: USGS quad 48SE, Burns
Driving Directions: Directions to Overnight Trail at Montgomery Bell State Park

Recent Trail Reviews

9/10/2007
0

The setting for this trail is beautiful...but...due to a bitting fly that caused the local deer population to become infected and die of hemoragic intestinal distress and dehydration; consequently,the waters edge was littered with decomposing Whitetail deer carcasses. No one from the park mentioned this problem; although, we called them three times to confirm various logistics. We were extremely disapponted with the park employee's cavalier attitude and lack of response to these decomposing corpses (two of which were laying IN the trail for a LONG period of time). I have hiked for over twenty years and never seen anything like this mass kill-off of animals. When querried about whether or not it may affect, or more corecctly infect, humans the park ranger said, "well, not that we know of, not yet anyway." I took my children to this place. Needless to say this was quite a disappointing experience, the stench of these animals decomposing, and from the looks of it they had been there a long time, was enough to make me never return to this park... for any reason.


1/13/2007
0

This was a pretty hike with changing scenery. The beginning was interesting with many sink holes. The hike is moderate to easy. We hiked the loop half way and then hiked by the lakes. We saw shelter 1 and shelter 2 and I was not impressed. We rather sleep in a tent, but there was no camping available along the trail. There is camping opportunity at the main entrance of the park. The trails were well maintained and marked.


8/6/2003
0

This trail was very enjoyable. You are hiking next to and crossing creeks many times during this trail. Some creeks are shallow and easily crossable and some have bridges. The creeks were beautiful and peaceful. You pass through hardwood, cedar, and pine forests. The trail was relatively easy with few hills to climb. There are three overnight shelters you can stay at with a reservation. I would definitely suggest getting a map that illustrates the trails since you occasionally dead-end into roads and you must walk a short ways before you hit the trail again. Without a map I believe I would have had a tough time knowing which way to go a few times.



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May 2018