Lake Moultrie Passage

Charleston, South Carolina

2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars2 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
2 out of 5
A two to three day backpack around the eastern side of Lake Moultrie that offers panoramic views of Lake Moultrie, cypress-filled wetlands, and plentiful waterfowl habitat. Although much of the Lake Moultrie Passage takes you over service roads on top of the lake’s dike system, the scenery is quite varied. The trail winds along the eastern edge of Lake Moultrie, passing through lush wetlands, regrowth forests, open loblolly pine savannas, and dense lowland forests. White-tailed deer, wild turkeys, red-tailed hawks, and hundreds of other species abound. Wildflowers bloom year-round.

Lake Moultrie Passage Professional Review and Guide

"A two to three day backpack around the eastern side of Lake Moultrie that offers panoramic views of Lake Moultrie, cypress-filled wetlands, and plentiful waterfowl habitat. Although much of the Lake Moultrie Passage takes you over service roads on top of the lake’s dike system, the scenery is quite varied.

The trail winds along the eastern edge of Lake Moultrie, passing through lush wetlands, regrowth forests, open loblolly pine savannas, and dense lowland forests. White-tailed deer, wild turkeys, red-tailed hawks, and hundreds of other species abound. Wildflowers bloom year-round."

Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking
Nearby City: Charleston
Distance: 28.4
Trail Type: Shuttle
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 2 to 3 days
Season: Early spring, late fall, and winter
Local Contacts: Santee Cooper Property Management Division, 1 Riverwood Drive, Moncks Corner, SC 29461; (843) 761-4068.
Local Maps: Brochures available at southern trailhead and from the Santee Cooper Property Management Division or Palmetto Trails; Bonneau, St. Stephen, and Pineville USGS quads
Driving Directions: Directions to Lake Moultrie Passage

Recent Trail Reviews

7/25/2009
0

8/20/2005
0

A 1-star rating of this trail may seem biased due to the poor choice of season I chose to hike it, subjecting myself to heat indexes of over 100 degrees and brutal sun exposure. The scenery here doesn't offer much to be desired. It is quite monotonous and the prime viewing leg of the trail is the first 3-4 miles; it is all downhill (figuratively) from there. After the beautiful view of the lake, which is upon a dike overlooking Lake Moultrie, there is an unappealing and longer than needed walk (the guide says 2.2 miles, be prepared for at least 3) through the town of Bonneau Beach. With all considerations the residents are very friendly and a few even offered cold water but keep in mind you are only 4 miles into the trail and trying to "get away from it all". After the trek through town there really isn't much more aspects of the trail worth going into detail over. You continue onto the dike surrounding the lake but it will be a couple of hours before you have any kind of view worth the trek you have undertaken. A couple of unneeded miles are then tacked on after about 11 miles into the trail while crossing over a branch of the lake. While there is a better view of the water it still rings the tone of monotony and the presence of the highway through most of this leg doesn't add to the enjoyment of the trek. Nature will make it's mark after a bit and this probably is the most pleasant part of the trip. It doesn't make up for the rest of it though, and soon after you are at the end of the trail. In the cooler seasons, though, it would do well for a beginning hiker not wanting to veer too far from the Charleston area. I would also recommend it for a cyclist who could do the length back and forth in a day. However, for the experienced backpacker/hiker, I would not recommend it for the reason that you are never very far from highways and communities. There are many more alternatives in the Carolinas for those seeking a natural getaway.



Activity Feed

May 2018