Turkey Creek Trail

Augusta, South Carolina

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1 Review
3 out of 5
A one-to-two day hike on a linear trail following the banks of Wine, Turkey and Stevens Creeks in the Savannah River Valley, featuring great cypress trees, slippery beaver runs, and scenic river views. Large, climax-stage hardwood forests, dotted with massive oaks and tall baldcypresses and their sleek cypress knees, characterize the area bordering Turkey and Stevens creeks, dark rivers that range from 40 to 80 feet wide. White-tailed deer and wild turkeys are plentiful, as are a variety of nongame birds, wildflowers, and butterflies.

Turkey Creek Trail Professional Review and Guide

"A one-to-two day hike on a linear trail following the banks of Wine, Turkey and Stevens Creeks in the Savannah River Valley, featuring great cypress trees, slippery beaver runs, and scenic river views.

Large, climax-stage hardwood forests, dotted with massive oaks and tall baldcypresses and their sleek cypress knees, characterize the area bordering Turkey and Stevens creeks, dark rivers that range from 40 to 80 feet wide. White-tailed deer and wild turkeys are plentiful, as are a variety of nongame birds, wildflowers, and butterflies."

Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking
Nearby City: Augusta
Distance: 12.5
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 1 or 2 days
Season: Year-round.
Local Contacts: Long Cane Ranger District, Sumter National Forest, 810 Buncombe Street, Edgefield, SC 29824; (803) 637-5396
Local Maps: Free map available from Long Cane Ranger District; Parksville and Clarks Hill USGS quads
Driving Directions: Directions to Turkey Creek Trail

Recent Trail Reviews

9/20/2008
0

It was a nice stroll through the woods, but you deffinetly need to wear pants because of all the brush. Also the trail along the river was washed out in one section so you had to go around it down another trail. Finally when we reached Key bridge we actually couldn't find where the trail continued on the other side of the road. There was a bridge and what looked like service road, but where the trail sign was there was nothing so we turned around.



Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018