Cape Cove Trail

Siuslaw National Forest, Oregon

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Cape Cove Trail is a hiking trail in Lincoln County, Oregon. It is within Siuslaw National Forest. It is 0.2 miles long and begins at 90 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.3 miles with a total elevation gain of 20 feet. Near the trailhead there are restrooms and parking. Along the trail there is a beach.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Cape Cove Trail is a hiking trail in Lincoln County, Oregon. It is within Siuslaw National Forest. It is 0.2 miles long and begins at 90 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.3 miles with a total elevation gain of 20 feet. Near the trailhead there are restrooms and parking. Along the trail there is a beach. This trail connects with the following: Captain Cook Trail and Trail of The Restless Waters.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Siuslaw National Forest
Distance: 0.2
Elevation Gain: Minimal
Trailhead Elevation: 90 feet
Top Elevation: 93 feet
Accessibility: Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Driving Directions: Directions to Cape Cove Trail
Parks: Siuslaw National Forest
Elevation Min/Max: 77/93 ft
Elevation Start/End: 90/90 ft
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Best Hikes with Dogs: Oregon

Best Hikes with Dogs: Oregon

The Cummins Creek Trail tours the watershed of Cummins Creek, climbing through recovering logged areas that are now alder-laced forest and arriving at a ridgetop to provide a nice view of the Pacific coast.

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Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

From the cape’s interpretive center, the Oregon Coast Trail rolls south through the forest 1.3 miles along the route of the old stage road. Follow it to access Gwynn Creek or Cummins Creek Trails, or just for an easy, short walk in the woods.

Pick up the Oregon Coast Trail at the interpretive center. At 1 mile Gwynn Creek Trail comes in from the left. Continuing south, the trail crosses the creek on a footbridge; cut down the grassy opening and across the highway to the wayside here, or continue south another 0.3 mile to the trail’s end.

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Best Easy Day Hikes: Oregon's North Coast

Best Easy Day Hikes: Oregon's North Coast

Take your pick of ten trails that wind through the 2,700-acre Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. Depending on the trail you select, you can experience a botanical wonderland of coastal forest, rocky tide pools, and other ocean spectacles, such as the geyser-like Spouting Horn and the narrow rock channel of Devil’s Churn.

Plan on spending a few hours at the Cape Perpetua Interpretive Center. The center provides a good introduction to the plants and animals that live here, as well as a look into the area’s rich history.

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Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

Steep, forested Cape Perpetua dominates the coastline south of Yachats. It’s formed of layers of lava that cooled into basalt and were uplifted millions of years ago.

This trail up and even over the cape’s tip is one of several options available to hikers in Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. It’s hiking for hiking’s sake; you could drive to the top of the cape, but then you’d miss the slow unfurling of the view to the south and the deep forest quiet on the north side of the cape.

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Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

Day Hiking: Oregon Coast

The main purpose of the Kittel-Amanda Trail, which leads up the north side of Cape Perpetua, is to get Oregon Coast Trail hikers, most of whom walk north to south, off the highway and onto a trail to ascend the cape. That’s why the hike over Cape Perpetua is described here as a oneway traverse from north to south.

Day hikers can make a round-trip hike on this trail as well, but they are more likely to start at the top and hike down (south to north) and back, as there is no trailhead parking along the highway at the north trailhead. The trail’s name commemorates Joanne and Norman Kittel, who made the trail extension possible by allowing it to cross their private forest land, and Amanda, the last living member of a local Indian tribe.

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Hiking the Oregon Coast

Hiking the Oregon Coast

Take your pick of ten trails that wind through the 2,700-acre Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. Depending on the trail you select, you can experience a botanical wonderland of coastal forest, rocky tide pools, and other ocean spectacles, such as the geyser-like Spouting Horn and the narrow rock channel of Devil’s Churn. While you’re here, plan on spending a few hours at the Cape Perpetua Interpretive Center.

The center provides a good introduction to the plants and animals that live here as well as a look into the area’s rich history. Trail surface: The trails in the Cape Perpetua Area are a combination of forest paths and paved paths. On the Restless Waters Trail, the stairs that lead down to Devil’s Churn can be wet and slippery. Sneaker waves can also catch you off guard at Devil’s Churn, and dogs and children should be supervised at all times!

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Hiking Oregon (State Hiking Guides Series)

Hiking Oregon (State Hiking Guides Series)

Take your pick of ten trails that wind through the 2,700-acre Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. Depending on the trail you select, you can experience a botanical wonderland of coastal forest, rocky tide pools, and other ocean spectacles, such as the geyser-like Spouting Horn and the narrow rock channel of Devil’s Churn.

While you’re here, plan on spending a few hours at the Cape Perpetua Interpretive Center. The center provides a good introduction to the plants and animals that live here as well as a look into the area’s rich history.

View Guide

Best Hikes with Dogs: Oregon

Best Hikes with Dogs: Oregon

Aptly named, the Giant Spruce Trail leads through spectacular old-growth forest.

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Recent Trail Reviews

11/20/2009
0

Beautiful hike! We took our dogs - they loved it as well. It is a wonderful view from the top - you can see forever from there!


3/17/2006
0

This is a beautiful hike along a ridge and down a valley in spectacular old growth forest. Trail is in excellent condition. While the trail head signs rate the hike "moderate to difficult" we would definitely call it moderate. You leave the Nature center hearing the rush of the ocean behind you, travel up a ridge and then descend next to a beautiful creek with the last half mile on a scenic ridge overlooking the ocean. Took us 3 hours at a moderate pace to travel the 6.5 miles.



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