Klamath River JC Boyle Powerhouse to Copco Reservoir

Keno, Oregon

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Between Keno and Copco Reservoir, the Klamath River crosses a plateau formed by volcanic rock that flowed northward form the Mount Shasta area. The river has not yet had time to form a deep canyon in the relatively recent lava flows, or to smooth out rocks along its bed. In many places on this run, rocks just seem to be in just the wrong spot, presenting interesting technical challenges. The run crosses wilderness and ranchland, with abundant birds, wildlife, and potentially good fishing. There are good campsites along the river’s upper section, though most people do the run in one day. It may be difficult to navigate the steepest 4 miles with loaded boats.
Paddling Oregon

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Paddling Oregon

by Robb Keller (Falcon Guides)

Between Keno and Copco Reservoir, the Klamath River crosses a plateau formed by volcanic rock that flowed northward form the Mount Shasta area. The river has not yet had time to form a deep canyon in the relatively recent lava flows, or to smooth out rocks along its bed. In many places on this run, rocks just seem to be in just the wrong spot, presenting interesting technical challenges.

The run crosses wilderness and ranchland, with abundant birds, wildlife, and potentially good fishing. There are good campsites along the river’s upper section, though most people do the run in one day. It may be difficult to navigate the steepest 4 miles with loaded boats.

©  Robb Keller/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Whitewater Kayaking & Canoeing
Nearby City: Keno
Distance: 18
Elevation Loss: 1,000 feet
Skill Level: Difficult
Class: Class IV-V
Season: Year-round
Local Contacts: Oregon Bureau of Land Management, 503-952-6001; Oregon River Levels, 503-261-9246
Driving Directions: Directions to Klamath River: J.C. Boyle Powerhouse to Copco Reservoir

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May 2018