Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake, Oregon

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1 Review
1 out of 5
The deep blue color of Crater Lake has been the objective of many attempted descriptions, but none comes close to the impact you will feel on seeing it for the first time. The first name given to it by non-native Americans was simply Deep Blue Lake. Perhaps that was not such a bad name, because the best description I can offer is to say that it is the bluest blue in all the world. It is 4.5 miles wide and six miles long, with a 20-mile shoreline. The dimensions and color are enough to attract visitors, but its setting, surrounded by lava cliffs ranging from 500 to 2,000 feet above the lake surface, make it all the more remarkable. The present mountain, which encompasses Crater Lake, is all that remains of a much larger mountain called Mount Mazama. This former giant reached 12,000 feet, before an ancient volcanic eruption caused the mountaintop to collapse, creating the huge caldera which is now Crater Lake. While the crater is the focal point of the park – people sometimes just come to stare at it for the whole day – there is a lot more to do and see. This eTrail explains in detail how to tour the park. In addition to a park map the details include driving tours, outdoor recreation, accommodations, campgrounds, dining, and more.

Crater Lake National Park Professional Review and Guide

"The deep blue color of Crater Lake has been the objective of many attempted descriptions, but none comes close to the impact you will feel on seeing it for the first time. The first name given to it by non-native Americans was simply Deep Blue Lake. Perhaps that was not such a bad name, because the best description I can offer is to say that it is the bluest blue in all the world. It is 4.5 miles wide and six miles long, with a 20-mile shoreline. The dimensions and color are enough to attract visitors, but its setting, surrounded by lava cliffs ranging from 500 to 2,000 feet above the lake surface, make it all the more remarkable.

The present mountain, which encompasses Crater Lake, is all that remains of a much larger mountain called Mount Mazama. This former giant reached 12,000 feet, before an ancient volcanic eruption caused the mountaintop to collapse, creating the huge caldera which is now Crater Lake. While the crater is the focal point of the park – people sometimes just come to stare at it for the whole day – there is a lot more to do and see. This eTrail explains in detail how to tour the park. In addition to a park map the details include driving tours, outdoor recreation, accommodations, campgrounds, dining, and more."

Activity Type: Scenic Drives
Nearby City: Crater Lake
Season: Year-round, best in summer
Local Contacts: Contact information for the park, accommodations, and dining are included in the eTrail.
Driving Directions: Directions to Crater Lake National Park

Recent Trail Reviews

6/27/2006
0

It innocently enough, a trail marked by little blue diamonds, climbing past an oil tank, in a national park. All was snow-covered, the trail buried waist-deep. It was late June. The Pacific Crest trail would be well-marked, one would think. A continuous two thousand miles of footpath would have to be. Certainly, better marked than a small fork heading up Dutton Creek. Or not. Soon after the blue diamonds disappeared, we happened upon a bog of pestilence, and I now know what a plague feels like. When the mosquitoes are so thick on your forearms that you have to choose between killing them every other second or taking time out to swat at the ones on your face, that's a plague. We did an uphill mile in about ten minutes. After eucalyptus and lemon drove the little monsters off, we regrouped. And realized that this was NOT on the map, this bog. After deciding that the creek must be right over there, we forged ahead with wills of steel and our heads down. When we crossed the tenth tiny rivulet of water, making our map completely obselete, it was decided that the only option was up. To the lake, to triumph. We scrambled. Rock climbed, handing the packs up bit by bit. The slope never hesitated for a moment, mounting up before us after each false summit. We were fucking lost. The desparate are inventive, and willing to experiment. When my friend said, "hey, that rock looks like the picture on the front of the map, just from the other side", I said ,"We're not going off the fucking picture." Yet we did. and after another couple miles, with the sun sinking in for the night and nary a campsite left bare by the snow, Rim Drive was under our feet, and the rapidly cooling air breezing by our extended thumbs as car after car after car blew by us, some waving, as if that was friendly. We ate by the side of the road - eggs and beef jerky is an excellent combination - and finally got a ride back down to our car.



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May 2018