Cannon Beach, OR

Cannon Beach, Oregon

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
A month after Lewis and Clark settled for the winter of 1805–6 near Astoria, Oregon, William Clark led a small party 20 miles south to a headland overlooking a “butifull Sand Shore.” No doubt, his vantage point was Tillamook Head, and what he described, most believe, is the expanse of beach stretching southward to what is now the city of Cannon Beach. The beach here is wide; the backdrop of craggy headlands is impressive. Adding to the area’s visual appeal are the many sea stacks just offshore. Most prominent, and certainly the most photographed, is Haystack Rock, one of two on the coast and three in the state so named. The one here stands 235 feet high, 92 feet shorter than the one south of Cape Kiwanda, but nonetheless interesting for its surroundings. The cannon after which Cannon Beach was named is from the U.S. Naval Survey schooner Shark, which broke up on Clatsop Spit at the mouth of the Columbia River on September 10, 1846. Part of the ship, including the cannon and capstan, washed ashore south of Tillamook Head. One of the area’s early settlers hauled the cannon and capstan away and set them in concrete. They are now exhibited at the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria. Cannons near the Cannon Beach exits on U.S. 101 are fair copies, made in 1953. The architecture in Cannon Beach is an interesting mixture of the quaint and the contemporary, aptly earning the town its nickname —“Carmel of Oregon.” Structures range from beachy little bungalows to hilltop manors, mostly glass and weathered wood, and a lot of shingles, shakes, and shutters. The strict building codes are kind to the eye and the environment. After a glimpse, it’s not surprising to learn that Cannon Beach is an artsy little community and the cultural center of the north coast. A number of artists live and work in the area and sell their works at local galleries. A thriving repertory company keeps the theater arts alive and lively, and an annual arts program revitalizes residents and visitors every year. This eTrail includes information on lodging, campgrounds, RV parks, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, and outdoor activities near this coastal city.

Cannon Beach, OR Professional Review and Guide

"A month after Lewis and Clark settled for the winter of 1805–6 near Astoria, Oregon, William Clark led a small party 20 miles south to a headland overlooking a “butifull Sand Shore.” No doubt, his vantage point was Tillamook Head, and what he described, most believe, is the expanse of beach stretching southward to what is now the city of Cannon Beach. The beach here is wide; the backdrop of craggy headlands is impressive. Adding to the area’s visual appeal are the many sea stacks just offshore. Most prominent, and certainly the most photographed, is Haystack Rock, one of two on the coast and three in the state so named. The one here stands 235 feet high, 92 feet shorter than the one south of Cape Kiwanda, but nonetheless interesting for its surroundings. The cannon after which Cannon Beach was named is from the U.S. Naval Survey schooner Shark, which broke up on Clatsop Spit at the mouth of the Columbia River on September 10, 1846. Part of the ship, including the cannon and capstan, washed ashore south of Tillamook Head. One of the area’s early settlers hauled the cannon and capstan away and set them in concrete. They are now exhibited at the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria. Cannons near the Cannon Beach exits on U.S. 101 are fair copies, made in 1953. The architecture in Cannon Beach is an interesting mixture of the quaint and the contemporary, aptly earning the town its nickname —“Carmel of Oregon.” Structures range from beachy little bungalows to hilltop manors, mostly glass and weathered wood, and a lot of shingles, shakes, and shutters. The strict building codes are kind to the eye and the environment. After a glimpse, it’s not surprising to learn that Cannon Beach is an artsy little community and the cultural center of the north coast. A number of artists live and work in the area and sell their works at local galleries. A thriving repertory company keeps the theater arts alive and lively, and an annual arts program revitalizes residents and visitors every year. This eTrail includes information on lodging, campgrounds, RV parks, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, and outdoor activities near this coastal city."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Cannon Beach
Season: Year-round
Local Contacts: Contact information for all attractions is provided in the eTrail
Driving Directions: Directions to Cannon Beach, OR

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Nearby Trails

Activity Feed

May 2018