Keuka Lake Outlet Trail

Yates County, New York

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4 Reviews
4 out of 5
Keuka Lake Outlet Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Yates County, New York. It is 6.7 miles long and begins at 512 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 13.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 523 feet. Outlet Trail and another parking are near the trailhead. Outlet Trail, Outlet Trail, and another parking can be seen along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Keuka Lake Outlet Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Yates County, New York. It is 6.7 miles long and begins at 512 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 13.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 523 feet. Outlet Trail and another parking are near the trailhead. Outlet Trail, Outlet Trail, and another parking can be seen along the trail.
Activity Type: Cross-Country Skiing, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Snowshoeing, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Yates County
Distance: 6.7
Elevation Gain: 523 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 512 feet
Top Elevation: 733 feet
Additional Use: Snowmobiling
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Driving Directions: Directions to Keuka Lake Outlet Trail
Elevation Min/Max: 466/733 ft
Elevation Start/End: 512/512 ft

Keuka Lake Outlet Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"The strip of land you will be skiing from Seneca Lake to Keuka Lake is steeped in history. You’ll see the evidence of places and events from several bygone eras as you head westward. In the middle of the nineteenth century, two fingers of water connected the 274-foot drop between Keuka and Seneca Lakes, they were, the outlet to power mills and the Crooked Lake Canal for boat traffic. A dam and guardhouse in Penn Yan controlled the water flow to both. The outlet, which still carries water from one lake to the next, was formed by a ground fault in the Tully limestone allowing water to run between the two lakes. Along its banks are remnants of the many mills that once harnessed the waterpower. Terrain: Gradual slope."

"The strip of land you will be skiing from Seneca Lake to Keuka Lake is steeped in history. You’ll see the evidence of places and events from several bygone eras as you head westward. In the middle of the nineteenth century, two fingers of water connected the 274-foot drop between Keuka and Seneca Lakes, they were, the outlet to power mills and the Crooked Lake Canal for boat traffic. A dam and guardhouse in Penn Yan controlled the water flow to both. The outlet, which still carries water from one lake to the next, was formed by a ground fault in the Tully limestone allowing water to run between the two lakes. Along its banks are remnants of the many mills that once harnessed the waterpower. Terrain: Gradual slope."

"The strip of land you will be walking from Seneca Lake to Keuka Lake is steeped in history. You'll see evidence of places and events from several bygone eras as you walk westward. In the middle of the nineteenth century, two fingers of water connected the 274-foot drop between Keuka and Seneca Lakes, the outlet to power mills, and the Crooked Lake Canal for boat traffic. A dam and guardhouse in Penn Yan controlled the water flow to both. The outlet, which still carries water from one lake to the next, was formed by a ground fault in the Tully limestone allowing water to run between the two lakes. Along its banks, you'll see remnants of the many mills which once harnessed the waterpower. Surface: Dirt (western end is paved)"

"Formerly called Minnesetah River, this stream starts out mildly in Penn Yan and picks up speed as it drops 300 feet on its 6-mile trek to Seneca Lake.

After a hiatus of nearly ten years, the state started annually stocking the stream again in 1999 with about 1,000 browns ranging from 8 to 13.5 inches. However, most anglers go up this creek searching for lake-run fish ranging from 3 to 10 pounds. Seneca Lake browns, mixed with a few landlocked salmon, start running around November and can be found all the way up to Cascade Mills, the first waterfall impassable by fish.

Rainbows about the same size run the same stretch in early April. Both species hit worms, egg sacs, streamers, silver Dardevle spoons, and white Rooster Tail spinners. From the mouth to Cascade Mills, the minimum length for salmon and trout is 15 inches, and the daily limit is three in any combination."

Recent Trail Reviews

4/29/2012
0

Nice, easy trail. Would have liked more signs indicating what things were.


11/14/2007
0

Nice trail that makes for an easy hike -- very flat. If you only want to do one way, transportation options back are limited. The history provided was very informative, but it would have been nice to have more mileage references. It would be a very nice bike trip at 14 miles. We just didn;t have time to walk there and back. Nicely maintained trail.


7/1/2007
0

Nice easy walk, lots of blackberries (but also lots of poison ivy!) A good hike with small children (at least the part of the trail that we did).


8/30/2004
0


Activity Feed

May 2018