Canadice Lake

Springwater, New York 14560

Canadice Lake

Canadice Lake Professional Review and Guide

"The hike along Canadice Lake’s western shore follows access roads for the Rochester Water Department. Consequently the trail is broad and in excellent condition. Slightly more invigorating than the lake strolls found elsewhere in the book, the length of this trail results in a bit more solitude than the shorter, often-crowded lake trails. Total trip length is 8 miles, but with clear footing and level terrain, the mileage flies by."

More Canadice Lake Professional Reviews and Guides

"Canadice Lake Trail has abundant wildlife and is a good place for family birdwatching. The main trail parallels the lake on a level, abandoned, gravel road. Other trails loop off the main trail, heading up the hillside into the forest. Birds Likely Seen:Variety of ducks and geese, shorebirds, herons, hawks, goldfinches, woodpeckers, bluebirds, orioles, variety of warblers, eagles, nuthatches, chickadees, titmice and thrushes."

"Long ago, Canadice Lake had cottages all along its shore. In 1872, the city of Rochester decided to use Canadice and Hemlock Lakes as a water supply. The first conduit for water was completed in 1876. By 1947, Rochester purchased all of the shoreline property and removed the cottages so that it could protect the water supply for its growing population. Although it was difficult for the cottage residents to leave their land, this area is now free of the commercialization that is so rampant on the other Finger Lakes. Ninety-foot-deep Canadice Lake is the smallest of the Finger Lakes, but it has the highest elevation, at 1,096 feet. This makes it a good water supply for the city and a good source of snowy trails for winter outdoor enthusiasts. The 3.7 mile long trail that parallels the lake is flat for easy skiing. For a challenge, head west, on the trails that wind up the hillside. You’ll find some short, steep sections. Terrain: Flat along the lake, steep hills on side loop trails."

"Explore the marshy area at the south end for shorebirds, ducks and perhaps a glimpse at bitterns and herons. Keep your eye to the sky for possible sightings of eagles and other birds of prey. Watch for deer along the lake shores. (A section of the lake at the northern tip is restricted access only.) Birds Likely Seen: Variety of ducks and geese, numerous shorebirds, herons, eagles and hawks."

"Long ago, Canadice Lake had cottages all along its shore. In 1872, the city of Rochester decided to use Canadice and Hemlock Lakes as a water supply. The first conduit for water was completed in 1876. By 1947, Rochester purchased all of the shoreline property and removed the cottages so that it could protect the water supply for its growing population. Although it was difficult for the cottage residents to leave their land, this area is now free of the commercialization that is so rampant on the other Finger Lakes. Ninety-foot-deep Canadice Lake is the smallest of the Finger Lakes, but it has the highest elevation, at 1,096 feet. This makes it a good water supply for the city and a good source of snowy trails for winter outdoor enthusiasts. The 3.7 mile long trail that parallels the lake is flat for easy skiing. For a challenge, head west, on the trails that wind up the hillside. You’ll find some short, steep sections. Terrain: Flat along the lake, steep hills on side loop trails."

"Long ago, Canadice Lake had cottages all along its shore. In 1872, the city of Rochester decided to use Canadice and Hemlock Lakes as a water supply. The first conduit for water was completed in 1876. By 1947, Rochester purchased all of the shoreline property and removed the cottages so that it could preserve the water supply for its growing population. Although it was difficult for the cottage residents to leave their land, this area is now free of the commercialization that is so rampant on the other Finger Lakes.

Ninety-foot-deep Canadice Lake is the smallest of the Finger Lakes, but it has the highest elevation, at 1,096 feet, which is one of the reasons it is such a good water supply for the city. Flow from Canadice Outlet Creek is diverted into the northern end of Hemlock Lake. From there the City of Rochester Water Bureau conditions the water for drinking and sends it north via large pipes. Surface: Two lane, gravel, grass."

"Covering 649 acres, averaging 50 feet deep, and dropping to a maximum of 95 feet deep, this is the smallest Finger Lake. Its shoreline is undeveloped. Key species: Lake trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, black bass, chain pickerel, and panfish"

Canadice Lake Reviews

4
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
icon1 Total
4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
5/25/2016
Lovely gravel trail with views of the lake through the trees. Easy walk, but I would suggest hiking boots as the gravel is not compacted and uneven in many spots. The wide path with wildflowers on either side is especially pretty this time of year. I imagine there must be a fair amount of runoff coming down the hill in the early spring as there are many cutouts in the hill. Some were still trickling even this time of the year. There wasn't but another soul on the path when we went: birds were singing, bees were buzzing and the lake was as still as glass. If you go later in the summer, plan on bringing insect repellent. There is a narrow rivulet of water to the right of the path that has standing water (sure to be a mosquito heaven : - )
0
Comments

Canadice Lake Photos

Trail Information

Springwater
Nearby City
Dog-friendly
Accessibility
8
Distance
Out-and-back
Trail Type
Easy to Difficult
Skill Level
2–3 hours
Duration
Year-round
Season
Skiing
Additional Use