Green Lake Trail

Green Lakes State Park, New York

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Green Lake Trail is a hiking trail in Town of Manlius, New York. It is within Green Lakes State Park. It is 0.6 miles long and begins at 420 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 138 feet. Near the trailhead there are benches. The Green Lake water can be seen along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Green Lake Trail is a hiking trail in Town of Manlius, New York. It is within Green Lakes State Park. It is 0.6 miles long and begins at 420 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 138 feet. Near the trailhead there are benches. The Green Lake water can be seen along the trail.
Activity Type: Birding, Cross-Country Skiing, Fishing, Hiking, Snowshoeing, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Green Lakes State Park
Distance: 0.6
Elevation Gain: 138 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 420 feet
Top Elevation: 442 feet
Additional Use: Swimming, Boating
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Parks: Green Lakes State Park
Elevation Min/Max: 419/442 ft
Elevation Start/End: 420/420 ft

Green Lake Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"This 64-acre lake’s beauty makes its park one of Central New York’s most popular. Created by an ancient glacial waterfall, the lake was believed to be bottomless by Indians and early settlers alike, but recent measurements reveal it is only 195 feet deep. Key species: Rainbow trout and northern pike"

"Two deep, turquoise lakes, an old-growth forest, and a veritable festival of wildflowers and wildlife combine to make this one of the most popular easy hikes in the Syracuse area."

"Like Devil’s Bathtub in Mendon Ponds Park south of Rochester, both Round and Green Lakes are meromictic lakes. Because they’re set in deep circular basins, winds do not cause the mixing of surface water with bottom water. There is no seasonal turnover of the water as occurs with most lakes. The name meromictic derives from the mirrored effect of the still water. Originally thought by Indians and early travelers to be bottomless, Round Lake has been measured at 180 feet, while Green Lake is 195 feet deep. The shorelines of both lakes drop off quickly and deeply, making skiing or snowshoeing on the frozen water dangerous and illegal. Round and Green Lakes are glacial lakes—products of the last ice age when an ice sheet more than 3,000 feet thick covered the area. About 10,000 years ago the ice sheet began to melt and recede northward. Torrents of water formed a glacial waterfall that carved the lake basins. The lakes are green. The color is due to a combination of factors—very deep, clear water, little suspended material or plant material in the water, and the presence of calcium carbonate. When light penetrates the water, the longer wavelengths (red end of the spectrum), are the first to be absorbed; only the blue and green wavelengths are transmitted to deeper water where they are reflected back to the observer. There’s a multitude of ski routes to choose from in this park. Terrain: Rolling hills and open meadow."

"Like Devil’s Bathtub in Mendon Ponds Park south of Rochester, both Round and Green Lakes are meromictic lakes. Because they’re set in deep circular basins, winds do not cause the mixing of surface water with bottom water. There is no seasonal turnover of the water as occurs with most lakes. The name meromictic derives from the mirrored effect of the still water. Originally thought by Indians and early travelers to be bottomless, Round Lake has been measured at 180 feet, while Green Lake is 195 feet deep. The shorelines of both lakes drop off quickly and deeply, making skiing or snowshoeing on the frozen water dangerous and illegal. Round and Green Lakes are glacial lakes—products of the last ice age when an ice sheet more than 3,000 feet thick covered the area. About 10,000 years ago the ice sheet began to melt and recede northward. Torrents of water formed a glacial waterfall that carved the lake basins. The lakes are green. The color is due to a combination of factors—very deep, clear water, little suspended material or plant material in the water, and the presence of calcium carbonate. When light penetrates the water, the longer wavelengths (red end of the spectrum), are the first to be absorbed; only the blue and green wavelengths are transmitted to deeper water where they are reflected back to the observer. There’s a multitude of ski routes to choose from in this park. Terrain: Rolling hills and open meadow."

"The loop around Green and Round Lakes is one of the flattest and easiest trails featured in the book. Often crowded and certainly busy any time of the year, this park won’t provide privacy (for that, add the Farmer’s Hill loop featured on page 64). So why would a crowded and easy stroll be included in a hiking book? Simply put, the rare nature of these lakes makes them a must-see for anyone exploring the region. ese lakes offer a literal and illustrative window into the natural forces that shaped the present-day landscape."

"The park was established in 1928. It has two glacially formed lakes, and rolling, wooded hills. Green Lake and Round Lake are two of a few lakes in the US that are meromictic. There is no spring or fall turnover as occurs in most lakes, so the surface water of meromictic lakes does not mix with the bottom water. Another meromictic lake is Devil's Bathtub in Mendon Ponds Park. Also unique, is the color of the water, hence the name of the park. Because the lakes are very clear, the green and blue wavelengths from visible light are able to penetrate to a great depth and are scattered and transmitted back to the observer’s eye. Birds Likely Seen: American goldfinches, robins and other thrushes, various types of warblers, woodpeckers, sparrows, whitebreasted nuthatches, chickadees, titmice, indigo buntings, scarlet tanagers, northern orioles."

"Of this park’s 1,955 acres, more than half of the acreage lies above and beyond the lakes. Yet many of the visitors to Green Lakes State Park don’t realize that the park extends far beyond the lakeside trails—which is unfortunate, for these visitors miss out on some truly distinctive aspects of the park, most notably the extensive oldgrowth forest surrounding Round Lake. But, fortunately for you, much of the trails in the upper part of the parks will be relatively uncrowded. ere still are many runners, bikers, and occasional hikers that venture up into the open fields and old-growth forest, but nothing like the crowds that stroll around the lakes."

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Jun 2018