Baker Creek Trail

Great Basin National Park, Nevada

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3 Reviews
5 out of 5
Baker Creek Trail is a hiking trail in White Pine County, Nevada. It is within Great Basin National Park. It is 5.9 miles long and begins at 8,002 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 11.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 4,309 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Baker Creek Trail is a hiking trail in White Pine County, Nevada. It is within Great Basin National Park. It is 5.9 miles long and begins at 8,002 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 11.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 4,309 feet. This trail connects with the following: South Fork Baker Creek Trail and National Forest Development Road 590.
Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Great Basin National Park
Distance: 5.9
Elevation Gain: 4,309 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 8,002 feet
Top Elevation: 11,308 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Baker Creek Trail
Parks: Great Basin National Park
Elevation Min/Max: 8002/11308 ft
Elevation Start/End: 8002/8002 ft
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Hiking Great Basin National Park

Hiking Great Basin National Park

A scenic hike to a pair of alpine lakes.

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Backpacking Nevada

Backpacking Nevada

Both Baker and Johnson lakes repose majestically in glacial cirques rimmed by rugged walls, beneath the crest of the southern Snake Range. However, these scenic alpine lakes are just two of the many attractions along this trip into the heart of Great Basin National Park backcountry.

Baker Creek and South Fork Baker Creek are two delightful streams that tumble down forested canyons as diverse as any drainages in the Great Basin. The verdant, pastoral parkland near the head of the South Fork is particularly stunning. History buffs will appreciate the area around Johnson Lake, where a long-abandoned tungsten mine has left remnants of a tramway, a stamp mill, and numerous log cabins.

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Recent Trail Reviews

7/3/2006
0

I loved this trip. It was a tough one though. The initial hike up to Baker lake with a pack was quite steep and the altitude got to me. But to wake up with those amazing cliffs towering above that lake was outstanding. I caught 4 trout out of Baker Lake in about an hour and they were tasty. The climb up Johnson pass is even worse then the climb to Baker lake about a 1000 in 3/4 of a mile but the views from the pass are amazing. Johnson lake while not as picturesque as Baker has some very cool old cabins and mining machinery to explore. Be prepared for a long steep hike out, the immediate trail from Johnson lake is an old road and rather rutted and a little tough on the knees. We decided to take the less traveled timber creek trail back to our vehicle and it was so steep we ran down much of it just to avoid falling on our butt. All and all a tough hike but worth every pounding step. I was able to take some of my best photography yet from these two lakes. Don't forget to turn around now and again and enjoy the amazing views down the valley that this remote park offers.


8/26/2002
0

Strenuous hike to 2 beautiful lakes. Baker lake is set in a steep cirque with awesome cliffs on the west and south shores. Cross-country route to Johnson pass is quite steep. From Johnson pass down to Johnson lake is very steep and exposed! You will also pass several abandoned mines and cabins along this loop hike. Take plenty of pictures!


8/26/2002
0

A wonderful forested hike to Bake Lake. Baker Lake is a small Alpine Lake surrouned by a half circle of white cliffs, facing east. At sunrise the cliffs go through a rainbow of color changes. The hike to Johnson Lake is quite strenuous and poorly marked. The view from Baker-Johnson Passes (two, one facing West and the other south) is fantastic.



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May 2018