Belknap Mountain

Gilford, New Hampshire

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A modest hike to a historic fire tower that remains in active service and an outstanding 360-degree view. Located in Belknap Mountain State Forest, Belknap Mountain is the highest mountain on the west side of Lake Winnipesaukee, though, at 2,382 feet, it’s really not very tall. The summit is wooded, but the fire tower lifts you above the trees to a fantastic view of the lake below and most of central New Hampshire beyond. Belknap Mountain was named for Jeremy Belknap, a local preacher, author, and historian who wrote one of the earliest books on New Hampshire in the late 1700s. There are several routes to the summit. The Green Trail is the shortest and most direct, but it follows an old service road to the tower with power lines along it and slick rocks underfoot.

Belknap Mountain Professional Review and Guide

"A modest hike to a historic fire tower that remains in active service and an outstanding 360-degree view. Located in Belknap Mountain State Forest, Belknap Mountain is the highest mountain on the west side of Lake Winnipesaukee, though, at 2,382 feet, it’s really not very tall. The summit is wooded, but the fire tower lifts you above the trees to a fantastic
view of the lake below and most of central New Hampshire beyond.

Belknap Mountain was named for Jeremy Belknap, a local preacher, author, and historian who wrote one of the earliest books on New Hampshire in the late 1700s. There are several routes to the summit. The Green Trail is the shortest and most direct, but it follows an old service road to the tower with power lines along it and slick rocks underfoot."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Gilford
Distance: 1.6
Elevation Gain: 700 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 2 hours
Local Maps: USGS West Alton Quad
Driving Directions: Directions to Belknap Mountain

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May 2018