Mount Pemigewasset Trail

Franconia Notch State Park, New Hampshire

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5 Reviews
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Mount Pemigewasset Trail is a hiking trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire. It is within Franconia Notch State Park. It is 1.4 miles long and begins at 2,518 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 2.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,273 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Mount Pemigewasset Trail is a hiking trail in Lincoln, New Hampshire. It is within Franconia Notch State Park. It is 1.4 miles long and begins at 2,518 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 2.9 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,273 feet. This trail connects with the following: Indian Head Trail and Franconia Notch Bike Path.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Franconia Notch State Park
Distance: 1.4
Elevation Gain: 1,273 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 2,518 feet
Top Elevation: 2,518 feet
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Driving Directions: Directions to Mount Pemigewasset Trail
Parks: Franconia Notch State Park
Elevation Min/Max: 1327/2518 ft
Elevation Start/End: 2518/2518 ft

Mount Pemigewasset Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"Mount Pemigewasset, also known as Indian Head, is a small peak with a large treeless rock ledge that provides excellent views for a moderate effort. Pemigewasset is an Abenaki Indian word meaning “rapidly moving,” which well describes the nearby Pemigewasset River. Pemigewasset was also a name given to a tribe of Native Americans that lived in the area during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Two trails lead to the summit of Mount Pemigewasset: the Indian Head Trail and the Mount Pemigewasset Trail, both of which climb the peak from US 3 in Lincoln. This hike follows the Mount Pemigewasset Trail, which leaves from the Flume Gorge Visitor Center and entails 400 less feet of elevation gain than the alternate route."

"The Mount Pemigewasset Trail ends on the northern end of Indian Head's brow, a broad strip of granite ledge with views across Bog Pond to the wild White Mountain region that holds the Lost River Valley, the distinctive mass of Mount Moosilauke, and the summits of Kinsman Ridge. Most people who arrive on this scenic brow are happy to perch on the ledge, enjoy the southern view, and pose for prize photographs of a hiker on top of the world."

"Mount Pemigewasset, also known as Indian Head, is a small peak with a large treeless rock ledge that provides excellent views for a moderate effort. Pemigewasset is an Abenaki Indian word meaning “rapidly moving,” which well describes the nearby Pemigewasset River. Pemigewasset was also a name given to a tribe of Native Americans that lived in the area during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Two trails lead to the summit of Mount Pemigewasset: the Indian Head Trail and the Mount Pemigewasset Trail, both of which climb the peak from US 3 in Lincoln. This hike follows the Mount Pemigewasset Trail, which leaves from the Flume Gorge Visitor Center and entails 400 less feet of elevation gain than the alternate route."

"An easy half-day hike to a broad open cliff and an equally broad view. Mount Pemigewasset is also called Indian Head because the mountain is shaped like the profile of a Native American. Mount Pemigewasset is also called Indian Head because the mountain is shaped like the profile of a Native American. There are two trails up Mount Pemigewasset: the
Indian Head Trail and the Mount Pemigewasset Trail. The trailheads are a mile apart. They are about the same length and converge just below the summit.

The Indian Head Trail is less populated, but the Mount Pemigewasset Trail (blue blazes) is preferable because it has easy parking and nearby bathroom facilities at the Flume Visitor Center. Not that the Mount Pemigewasset Trail is overcrowded. The Flume, a narrow gorge with man-made walkways, is accessible from the back of the visitor center for a small fee."

"The Mount Pemigewasset Trail climbs to the summit of Mount Pemigewasset, a 2,500-foot peak at the southern end of Franconia Notch and the location of the famed Indian Head profile. The climb is a good one for children since it’s never very steep. The views from the top are excellent, and the combination of stream crossings and rocks in the forest make for an interesting walk."

"Mount Liberty is a challenging hike, especially the last two-thirds of the hike up a sustained rocky surface, but you’re rewarded with dramatic views of the Franconia Ridge and the Notch."

"Mount Pemigewasset is also called Indian Head because the mountain is shaped like the pro .le of a Native American. There are two trails up Mount Pemigewasset, the Indian Head Trail and the Mount Pemigewasset Trail. About the same length, they converge just below the summit.

The Indian Head Trail is less popular, but the Mount Pemigewasset Trail (blue blazes) is preferable because it has easy parking and nearby bathroom facilities at The Flume Visitor Center. Not that the Mount Pemigewasset Trail is overcrowded. The Flume, a narrow gorge with man-made walk- ways, is accessible from the back of the visitor center for a small fee. It draws most of the tourist traffic, leaving Mount Pemigewasset surprisingly quiet, despite the moderate mileage and the breathtaking views from its summit."

Recent Trail Reviews

9/19/2010
0

Beautiful views from the south facing clifts at the summit.


9/11/2010
0

Steep hike well worth the view from the top. If hiking with a dog - bring extra water as the streams are pretty much dry at the moment.


8/1/2009
0

4/12/2009
0

Amazing views of the mountains that surround the town of Lincoln, trail was VERY muddy since it had rained the night before, but the views were deffinitly worth every step. Very easy trail to follow, a little crowded of a hike, but it was a nice day, would recommend this to anyone looking to see some picturesque views of NH. The top is a not so child friendly, it is a cliff, and little ones should be watched carefully!!


11/26/2006
1

This was a great hike. It was a challenge as it was a steady uphill climb for most of the trail. The trail is narrow, very clearly blazed with yellow, so easy to follow. A few steep parts but all negotiable over the small boulders, not sure if those areas would be real wet in spring. I enjoy hiking in the late fall as the leaves are off the trees and you get some good views on your way up. There is a long section in the begining that follows a brook, a couple crossing, one that might be hard a bit more difficult in the spring. The look out at 1.5miles over the lakes region was a good lunch spot, full sun and out of the breeze at the top (important in late Nov.) The view at the top over the Sandwich range and further north is stunning.



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May 2018