Ole Creek

Glacier National Park, Montana

Distance16.6mi
Elevation Gain7,362ft
Trailhead Elevation6,950ft
Top6,950ft
Elevation Min/Max3995/6950ft
Elevation Start/End6950/6950ft

Ole Creek

Ole Creek is a hiking trail in Glacier County and Flathead County, Montana. It is within Glacier National Park. It is 16.6 miles long and begins at 6,950 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 33.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 7,362 feet. The Ole Lake camp site can be seen along the trail. This trail connects with the following: Fielding and Firebrand Pass.

Ole Creek Professional Reviews and Guides

"The area between Fielding and Ole Creek, near the top of the Continental Divide, receives several hundred inches of snow every winter and often has snow early and late season. Fielding, named for the Fielding Siding where trains can pass each other, was once next to a rough-and-tumble town called McCarthysville. When the Great Northern Railway laid tracks here in 1891, a Chinese kitchen stood at Fielding in between sets of tracks. Although the town existed only three winters, tales abound of its toughness. Body counts during spring thaw revealed miners, boom town characters, Chinese workers, and outlaws who lived and died there. Ole Creek, named for a Scandinavian trapper, was called Buckskin Horse Creek by the Kootenai Indians. Skiers and snowshoers who choose to do the entire 10-mile route from Fielding Picnic Area to Ole Creek and down to the Walton Ranger Station should plan for a very long day or else come equipped for winter camping along the trail.

Check with the Park Service before you make an overnight stay, both to obtain a backcountry permit and for information regarding snow bridges crossing Ole Creek. Adventurers who wish for an easier day trip can travel either from Fielding to Ole Creek and back out for a 7-mile round trip, or from Walton Ranger Station to Ole Creek, a 2.2-mile round trip."

"The area between Fielding and Ole Creek, near the top of the Continental Divide, receives several hundred inches of snow every winter and often has snow early and late season. Fielding, named for the Fielding Siding where trains can pass each other, was once next to a rough-and-tumble town called McCarthysville. When the Great Northern Railway laid tracks here in 1891, a Chinese kitchen stood at Fielding in between sets of tracks. Although the town existed only three winters, tales abound of its toughness. Body counts during spring thaw revealed miners, boom town characters, Chinese workers, and outlaws who lived and died there. Ole Creek, named for a Scandinavian trapper, was called Buckskin Horse Creek by the Kootenai Indians. Skiers and snowshoers who choose to do the entire 10-mile route from Fielding Picnic Area to Ole Creek and down to the Walton Ranger Station should plan for a very long day or else come equipped for winter camping along the trail.

Check with the Park Service before you make an overnight stay, both to obtain a backcountry permit and for information regarding snow bridges crossing Ole Creek. Adventurers who wish for an easier day trip can travel either from Fielding to Ole Creek and back out for a 7-mile round trip, or from Walton Ranger Station to Ole Creek, a 2.2-mile round trip. Surface quality: Snowshoe-packed."

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Trail Information

Glacier National Park
Nearby City
Glacier National Park
Parks
Glacier National Park, Avalanche Info, (800)-526-5329
Local Contacts

Activity Feed

Oct 2018