Jordan Pond House Trail

Acadia National Park, Maine

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4 Reviews
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Jordan Pond House Trail is a hiking trail in Hancock County, Maine. It is within Acadia National Park. It is 0.4 miles long and begins at 275 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 23 feet. The Jordan Pond House (elevation 299 feet) gift shop and the Jordan pond restaurant are near the trailhead. There are also restroom and a cafe.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Jordan Pond House Trail is a hiking trail in Hancock County, Maine. It is within Acadia National Park. It is 0.4 miles long and begins at 275 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 23 feet. The Jordan Pond House (elevation 299 feet) gift shop and the Jordan pond restaurant are near the trailhead. There are also restroom and a cafe.
Activity Type: Fishing, Hiking, Mountain Biking, Snowshoeing, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Acadia National Park
Distance: 0.4
Elevation Gain: Minimal
Trailhead Elevation: 275 feet
Top Elevation: 298 feet
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Driving Directions: Directions to Jordan Pond House Trail
Parks: Acadia National Park
Elevation Min/Max: 275/298 ft
Elevation Start/End: 275/275 ft

Jordan Pond House Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"A dramatic climb along Jordan Cliffs, this trail provides breathtaking views of Jordan Pond, the Bubbles, and surrounding scenery and features iron rungs and exposed ledges. The cliffs are a favorite nesting area for peregrine falcons, so sections of the trail may be closed at certain times of the year.

The best time to climb the Jordan Cliffs Trail is earlier in the day, before the sun starts sinking behind the Penobscot ridge. The best season is late summer into fall to avoid the possibility of the trail being closed for peregrine falcon nesting season. These occasional closures help the success of Acadia’s reintroduction program, which between 1991 and 2015 had resulted in more than 120 peregrine falcon chicks fledging, or able to fly, from cliff side nests."

"On this hike you will have expansive views of Jordan Pond, the Bubbles, and Jordan Cliffs, as well as a chance to glimpse a colorful merganser duck or watch kayakers.

The graded gravel path on the east side of the pond is particularly easy, and an amazing 4,000 feet of log bridges on the west side help smooth the way over what would otherwise be a potentially wet, rocky, and root-filled trail."

"This hike offers expansive views of Jordan Pond, the Bubbles, and Jordan Cliffs, as well as a chance to glimpse a colorful merganser duck or watch kayakers plying the waters.

The graded gravel path on the east side of the pond is particularly easy, and an amazing 4,000 feet of log bridges on the west side helps smooth the way over what would otherwise be a potentially wet, rocky, and root-filled trail."

"Like most of the water bodies on Mount Desert Island, Jordan Pond is long and narrow. Running north-to-south, the pond is a classic reminder of the glacial history that shaped the landscape.

In addition to its bright blue waters and mountain scenery, Jordan Pond is an ideal location to begin any number of loop hikes, from flat 1-mile nature trails to all-day adventures over the highest elevations in the park. The following half-day journey showcases the best of Jordan Pond and opens the door to limitless future travels."

"It’s but a short woods walk from the Jordan Pond House along the meandering Jordan Stream to the highlight of this trail: a carriage road bridge made entirely of cobblestones rather than the cut granite of other bridges in the carriage road system. You may have company as you stop to admire the Cobblestone Bridge—this is a popular place for horse-drawn carriages to let off passengers.

Even in its short distance, the Jordan Stream Path provides hikers with a historical flavor. About one hundred years ago, the trail was laid out by the Seal Harbor Village Improvement Association as a scenic connector between the village and Jordan Pond. In the 1700s and earlier, it may have been part of a Native American canoe carry trail connecting Jordan Pond to the ocean."

"This Acadia National Park hike is long on beauty and history. Start at the Jordan Pond House, where social gatherings based on popovers and tea became legendary. From there walk around Jordan Pond, as visitors have done for more than a century. Climb South Bubble for a fantastic view of Jordan Pond and Atlantic Ocean beyond. On your return trip, walk a section of the historic carriage roads that lace the park.

The hike parallels the eastern shore then reaches South Bubble Trail. Gaze back across the pond and then take the bouldery South Bubble Trail. It is a short, steep, fun scramble up the south face of South Bubble. Open onto outcrops affording magnificent views. Look back on Jordan Pond, Jordan Pond House, Seal Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, dotted by the Cranberry Isles. Take a side trail to view Bubble Rock, a balanced boulder seemingly about to topple."

"Jordan Pond covers only 187 acres but is amazingly deep. Most of the pond, including shoreline areas, is well over 100 feet deep. Because Jordan Pond is a local water supply, the south end is marked as off limits to swimmers.

The boat ramp is located in this zone and boaters are advised to travel past the white buoys before starting to fish. Boats with motors over 10 horsepower are prohibited. The daily bag limit on salmon, brook trout, and lake trout is two fish in the aggregate. Key Species: landlocked salmon, brook trout, lake trout."

"Take in the dramatic scenery of Jordan and Bubble Ponds on this moderate ride."

"A lot is packed into this short self-guided trail including panoramic views of Jordan Pond and the distinctive Bubbles on the far shore as well as lessons in history and nature.

Be prepared for the trail to be crowded during the height of the season because it is so accessible. Highlights: Self-guided nature trail through woods and along Jordan Pond."

"A moderate ride next to the dramatic scenery of Jordan and Bubble ponds. Jordan Pond is arguably the most scenic pond in Acadia National Park, with its deep blue waters reflecting the steep cliffs of Penobscot Mountain and the graceful curves of the Bubbles. Bubble Pond is smaller and more intimate, with dramatic scenery of its own as the steep west face of Cadillac Mountain rises above its eastern shoreline.

This is one of the longer rides in the carriage-road system, but its grades are never steep. For this reason, it makes a great day trip for a family with older children who are comfortable spending the day on bikes. Of course, following your ride, you can recharge your system with tea and popovers at the Jordan Pond House."

"Get some quiet views of a scenic lake and impressive peaks in one loop. First walk along a pre – Revolutionary War canoe carry trail and hug the shores of Eagle Lake, then climb over Conners Nubble and North Bubble before circling back to the start.

This loop hike offers the chance to stroll along the quiet western shore of Eagle Lake, climb the less-known Conners Nubble, and pick plump wild blueberries.

From the Bubble Rock parking area, head west to hook up with Jordan Pond Carry at 0.1 mile. Turn right (north) onto Jordan Pond Carry, toward Eagle Lake. Cross a carriage road at 0.5 mile, and reach the southern tip of the lake at 0.6 mile."

Recent Trail Reviews

8/20/2009
0

Climbed up Jordan Cliff trail and down Pembescot Mt Trail. Fun and varied terrain on the jc trail and the exposed summit makes for a really nice descent.


8/25/2008
0

This was the first trail we went on when we got to Acadia National Park. This part of the was more difficult then the first, but that was fine. The views were amazing and the trail was fun to do.


8/3/2008
0

This is a nice, beautiful trail around Jordan Pond in Acadia Park. The first 1.5mi on the west side is very smooth, flat hike around the pond. There are signs indicating no swimming, there is a small beach toward the middle of the hike that seems to get some traffic, and a small wooden bridge to cross to the east side. From here, pretty much for the next 1.5 mi on the trail to the east side gets very rocky and in some spots wet (however boards have been placed down over the wet sections). My wife (not a hiker) had problems on the west side. If you are just looking for a nice stroll, you will want to turn around at the wooden bridge, past 1.5mi.


5/15/2008
0

Took wrong turn and ended going to the top of Cadilac Mountain!



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May 2018