Dickeyville Trail

Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park, Maryland

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Dickeyville Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Baltimore, Maryland. It is within Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park. It is 0.7 miles long and begins at 233 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.4 miles with a total elevation gain of 104 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Dickeyville Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Baltimore, Maryland. It is within Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park. It is 0.7 miles long and begins at 233 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 1.4 miles with a total elevation gain of 104 feet. This trail connects with the following: Gwynns Falls Trail and Wetland Trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park
Distance: 0.7
Elevation Gain: 104 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 233 feet
Top Elevation: 237 feet
Parks: Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park
Elevation Min/Max: 183/237 ft
Elevation Start/End: 233/233 ft

Dickeyville Trail Professional Review and Guide

"It’s a cliché, but there’s really little other way to state it: turning off Forest Park Ave. into the enclave of Dickeyville is like performing time travel. There’s a reason exploring Dickeyville feels like stepping back in time; Dickeyville’s beginnings date to a time when the United States of America was still but a notion. As early as the 1670s, Richard Gwynn set up a post here to trade with native Algonquians. By 1719, the first of what would later become a host of mills popped up on the banks of the Gwynns Falls. The establishment of the village you see today dates to the 1770s. It began to prosper with the building of the Franklin Paper Mill in the early 1800s. Three brothers of the Wethered family converted the mill in 1829 to a woolen mill. The brothers built some 30 stone houses for mill workers, plus a church and a school, and named the village Wetheredsville. In the 1870s, the Wethereds sold the entire area to William Dickey: 300 acres, the mill, and all the surrounding buildings. Dickey died in 1896, but two years later, the village was renamed in his honor. Today, all of Dickeyville is on the National Register of Historic Places. Many original buildings remain, some more than 200 years old and still privately inhabited. Nationally recognized author Laura Lippman, a former Baltimore Sun journalist and creator of the popular Tess Monaghan mystery series (among other notable works), grew up in Dickeyville; her 2011 novel, The Most Dangerous Thing, is set here, opening with a group of children playing kickball next to a cotton mill on Wetheredsville Road. Lippman consistently proves a great read (she’s received effusive praise from notable authors such as Stephen King and Dennis Lehane), but after taking this walk, you’ll definitely want to read The Most Dangerous Thing if you haven’t already—Dickeyville and Leakin Park play the roles of outsize characters, informing the novel’s major plot points."

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Jun 2018