Noanet Woodlands

Dover, Massachusetts 2030

Noanet Woodlands

Noanet Woodlands Professional Review and Guide

"Ultimately, the paths through the forest evoke a sense of peacefulness. This happens because most of this route takes less attention to navigate but still rolls through beautiful stands of trees, over bubbling streams, and beside glistening ponds.

At the end of one path there is a large house across a field of grass and wildflowers. This is as close to civilization as the area get. Terrain: Packed-dirt double and singletrack. Some singletrack has loose rocks and roots. Some muddy sections and a few grinding climbs and fast descents."

More Noanet Woodlands Professional Reviews and Guides

"Diversity of terrain is what makes Noanet so special; swamplands, brooks, millponds, a waterfall, upland forests, and a 387-foot peak can all be found here. These features provide excellent nature study as well as hiking, jogging, and cross-country skiing on the reservation’s extensive network of trails.

The variety of terrain, coupled with the fact the property abuts privately owned Hale Reservation (1,200 acres) and Powisset Farm (105 acres), makes this an ideal wildlife refuge. Highlights: Hilltop view, pond, old mill site."

"An extensive network of trails leads to a millpond and waterfall and up to modest Noanet Peak, where there are views across forested hills to the Boston skyline."

"This 800-acre preserve offers a good mix of passive recreation like fishing in the mill pond for blue gills, summit views of the Boston skyline, and an historic ironwork site. This is all possible due not only to the foresight of Amelia Peabody, who added to her estate over the years, but also to her generosity in donating it for public use while she was still alive."

"Less than an hour away from the city, Noanet Woodlands is one of the area’s best-kept secrets for hiking with your dog. The quiet surroundings, diverse environments, and spectacular views make these 695 acres a great place to visit year-round. Noanet Woodlands features three color-coded trails (yellow, blue, and red), and many intersections are marked with a number. The Trustees of Reservation map makes it much easier to navigate the network of trails."

"Like the nearby, affluent town of Dover, this rolling ramble seems built for comfort. Its broad, well-marked trails with their numbered intersections bring you across a brook and over a scenic vista as a proper introduction before leading up to Noanet Peak.

At 371 feet the peak itself offers a peek at the Boston skyline 20 miles to the east. This loop also passes near a historic millpond and stone millworks as it leads through a
mature white pine and red oak forest, punctuated with beech and birch trees."

"This hike traverses undulating woodlands named for Noanet, a chief of the Natick tribe who was well-known among Dover's first white settlers. Circling the ravine carved by Noanet Brook, the trail diverts to the reservation's highest point, Noanet Peak, then passes near the site of a 19th century mill.

The Noanet Woodlands is dog-friendly, but dogs are not allowed in the parking lot at the adjoining Caryl Park."

Noanet Woodlands Reviews

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8/1/2004
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Trail Information

Dover
Nearby City
Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Accessibility
5.9
Distance
572 feet
Elevation Gain
Loop/Lollipop
Trail Type
Easy to Moderate
Technical Difficulty
Easy to Moderate
Physical Difficulty
Moderate
Skill Level
1.5 hours
Duration
The park is open most of the year. The trails are closed when cross-country skiing conditions exist and also when the trails are muddy. This is usually form March 1 through April 30.
Season
150 feet
Trailhead Elevation
340 feet
Top Elevation
Skiing
Additional Use
Noanet Woodlands, c/o Trustees of Reservations, 781-821-2977
Local Contacts
USGS Medfield; Maps are available form the TOR Regional Office.
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Oct 2018