Devils Fork - Bathtub - Forest Road 619

Jefferson National Forest, Virginia 24219

Distance7.2mi
Elevation Gain3,724ft
Trailhead Elevation3,499ft
Top3,499ft
Elevation Min/Max1549/3499ft
Elevation Start/End3499/3499ft

Devils Fork - Bathtub - Forest Road 619

Forest Road 619-Devils Fork is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Scott County, Virginia. It is within Jefferson National Forest. It is 7.2 miles long and begins at 3,499 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 14.4 miles with a total elevation gain of 3,724 feet.

Devils Fork - Bathtub - Forest Road 619 Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

Hiking Virginia - 4th Edition (Falcon Guides)
Bill and Mary Burnham
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"Devils Fork is a luxuriant streamscape of rocks, cliffs, and small cascades that grow in size and frequency as you hike. It all comes together at the Devils Bathtub, where a long waterfall trips step by step over shale bedrock and crashes in a swirl of currents into a bowl-like pool—the bathtub. Framed by tall hemlocks and rhododendron, this scenery is as lush and abundant as the landscape a few hundred feet upslope is simple and unadorned. Prepare to get wet, as there are many stream crossings on this hike, at least five in the first mile alone! Best done in warmer weather." Read more
Five-Star Trails: Tri-Cities of Tennessee and Virginia (Menasha Ridge Press)
Johnny Molloy
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"Hike through an incredible gorge where Devil’s Fork carves a canyon with boulder fields, cliffs, cataracts, and, of course, the Devil’s Bathtub, all shaded by an immense forest. However, to see this beauty you have to make more than a dozen stream fords, making it a warm-season destination. You are amply rewarded with not only the above mentioned beauty but also a deep swimming hole with aquamarine depths that chill to the bone." Read more

Devils Fork - Bathtub - Forest Road 619 Reviews

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6/29/2018
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10/25/2008
Nice trail. Wasn't very well marked, but pretty easy to follow. Had extra time so planned on overnighting it since we saw two primitive campsites that were supposed to be by the trail. We looked for both, never found either. Devil's bathtub was very neat. Will probably do it again pretty soon.
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6/14/2008
This was a good hike! My dad organized this hike and had a party of eight. We set out to hike to the devils bathtub. after a while we kind of got split up due to picture taking and checking out the scenery.My son and I past by the bathtub and went at least 1 mile before turning back. On the way my son spotted a sign pointing us to the devils bathtub. We finely found it after a few hours
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4/10/2007
Rugged "trail". For much of it, we simply followed yellow blazes on the trees with no evidence of a trail. Lots of deadfall to go over/under/around; almost indistinguishable paths through undergrowth. Took much longer than the 4 hours suggested by the guidebook - often due to navigational challenges. Most importantly, at the 6-mile mark, the yellow-blazes turned north (left) when you should go south (right). We went the right way but it could easily mislead someone not alert to the change of direction. Still, a good adventure.
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3/26/2006
I did this loop with my dogs, while my wife and little boy were out of town, so I could check to see if it is "baby-friendly". It's not! Probably ten or twelve would be the minimum age for this trail. It is a very nice hike, nonetheless. I had read the trail description, and so knew about the numerous stream crossings on the first leg, but I thought maybe I could just rock-hop to stay dry. This plan held up through the first two or three crossings, but took a lot of time. Eventually I got to a crossing where I had no choice but to just walk through. So, while you should expect to have wet feet on this hike, the water is only about knee-deep. I was really impressed with how well marked the trail was with closely spaced yellow blazes, which is good, because in many places the trail is very difficult to discern. But here's my warning: When you get to the spot designated on the trail guide as mile 5.5 "Turn right (downhill) onto the Devil's Fork Loop Trail", the blazes continue uphill. I walked uphill about two miles (I had left both the map and my GPS at home - yeah, I know) before I convinced myself that I had missed a turn. When I finally got back to the place where I should have turned, I realized that there is a post in the ground, that looks like it used to hold a directional sign, but from which that sign has apparently been wrenched off. So, if you forget your GPS and/or map, look for the naked signpost at mile 5.5, and turn right!! Wildlife we saw included two quail, three pheasants, and one skunk (luckily I saw the skunk before my dogs did!).
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Devils Fork - Bathtub - Forest Road 619 Photos

Trail Information

Jefferson National Forest
Nearby City
Jefferson National Forest
Parks
Dog-friendly
Accessibility
Moderate to Difficult
Skill Level
Hunting
Additional Use
Waterfalls
Features
Jefferson National Forest
Local Contacts
USGS East Stone Gap
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Dec 2018