Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Trail

Forsyth, Georgia

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Red-cockaded woodpeckers were once common in the longleaf pine forests of Georgia. Timber harvesting and farming that began in the 1800s, however, destroyed much of the longleaf pine habitat, and in 1970 the red-cockaded woodpecker was declared an endangered species. Fortunately, the population of these birds is recovering thanks to conservation efforts on private and public lands. The 35,000-acre Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge is home to several colonies of red-cockaded woodpeckers that inhabit well-managed tracts of loblolly and shortleaf pines.

Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge: Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Trail Professional Review and Guide

"Red-cockaded woodpeckers were once common in the longleaf pine forests of Georgia. Timber harvesting and farming that began in the 1800s, however, destroyed much of the longleaf pine habitat, and in 1970 the red-cockaded woodpecker was declared an endangered species.

Fortunately, the population of these birds is recovering thanks to conservation efforts on private and public lands. The 35,000-acre Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge is home to several colonies of red-cockaded woodpeckers that inhabit well-managed tracts of loblolly and shortleaf pines."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Forsyth
Distance: 3
Elevation Gain: 270 feet
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 1½ hours
Season: Spring, fall, and winter
Accessibility: Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Local Contacts: Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge
Local Maps: A Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge trail map is available online at www.fws.gov/piedmont/trails.html

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Jun 2018