Conasauga River

Crandall, Georgia 30711

Conasauga River

Conasauga River Professional Review and Guide

"Considered by some authorities to be one of the top 100 trout streams in the nation, the pristine 15-mile stretch of the Conasauga River is within the Cohutta Wilderness Area. The core of the Conasauga River trout fishery is found on the 37,000 acres of the Cohutta Wilderness Area. Travel in this block of rugged mountain country is restricted to non-mechanical methods of transportation, which in practice means on foot, or in a few designated areas, on horseback.

Although the designated trout water portion of the river extends beyond the wilderness area, it is marginal trout fishing at best. Some brown trout are also present, and what they lack in numbers they make up for in size. At the highest elevations in the tributaries and main stem itself, even brook trout are a possibility. Since no stocking has occurred in the river in many years, all trout are stream-spawned fish. Although rainbows up to 20 inches and browns weighing more than 5 pounds are possible, most fish caught will be in the 10-inch range. Because the Conasauga River flows through a valley that has laid undisturbed for many years now, the stream remains clear even during high water."

Conasauga River Reviews

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7/18/2018
One of the most unique things about the Conasauga River is the fact that it’s home to a popular snorkeling hole. Yes – that’s right. A snorkeling hole in the mountainous Cohutta wilderness. The water is freezing, so wetsuits are advised for anyone who wants to snorkel this area. It’s worth braving the cold to have an opportunity to catch glimpses of some of the dozens of species of fish that live in this amazingly biologically diverse section of river, which is located near the edge of the Cohutta wilderness. Around 40 species of fish have been seen at the snorkeling hole, and it is believed that 70 or more species are actually present in the area. Examples of threatened species that can be seen in the area include amber darter, blue shiner, coldwater darters, Conasauga logperch, and more. If you’re game to jump in and have (or can rent) the proper gear, this is an adventure like no other!
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7/18/2018
If you’re looking to canoe or kayak a portion of the Conasuaga, you’ll be excited to learn that Dalton Utilities and the Conasauga River Alliance have partnered to install two canoe launches in Murray County Georgia. The northern launch is in Beaverdale (on Highway 2, behind the Superette) and the southern launch is in Dawnville, at the Norton Bridge located on Lower Kings Bridge Road. For a great float trip, park a car at the Dawnville launch, then drive your boats up to Beaverdale to put in and float down.
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9/5/2009
We (first time fly fishermen) were looking for a place to fly fish and found the conasauga river trail just the beginning of a day I will not forget. I expected to find trash left behind everywhere just as I have on so many other adventures in Georgia but not this time. Unfortunately you can't escape cigarette butts and toilet tissue. There were Rhododendrons, Virginia Pines and Spruce trees every where. The river was sparkling clean and rushing over rocks large and small. We met famllies along the trail and young and old carried a backpack including the dog. We didn't catch any trout but we sure had fun trying.
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5/7/2004
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Conasauga River Photos

Trail Information

Crandall
Nearby City
Best way to fish: wading
Duration
Best April through November
Season & Limits
US Forest Service, Cohutta Ranger District; Cohutta Wilderness
Local Contacts
DeLorme Georgia Atlas and Gazetteer
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Sep 2018