Ibex Spring Road

Death Valley National Park, California

Distance5.2mi
Elevation Gain652ft
Trailhead Elevation1,592ft
Top1,592ft
Elevation Min/Max988/1592ft
Elevation Start/End1592/1592ft

Ibex Spring Road

Ibex Spring Road is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in San Bernardino County, California. It is within Death Valley National Park. It is 5.2 miles long and begins at 1,592 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 10.4 miles with a total elevation gain of 652 feet.

Ibex Spring Road Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

Backcountry Adventures: Southern California (Adler Publishing )
Peter Massey & Jeanne Wilson
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"This short spur trail leads away from Ibex Dunes Trail and passes several historic points of interest along its length. The formed trail is well used and is easy to follow as far as Ibex ghost town. Erosion is a constant problem along the way; several deep gully washouts have to be negotiated or bypassed. At Ibex, easily spotted from a distance by the large palm trees at the spring, the trail branches in four directions. Continuing straight ahead leads into the center of the camp, where the Mojave River Valley Museum of Barstow (which has adopted the site) has placed a marker and visitors book. Many of the old houses and structures around Ibex are still standing. These date from the days of the talc mining operations in the 1930s. Past Ibex, the trail continues for 0.9 miles to the Moorehouse Talc Mine, where you can see extensive remains of the wooden loading chutes and tramway. Photographers will find some excellent viewpoints from this location. Bearing right at the 4-way intersection and remaining in the wash takes you to Ibex Spring itself, which is surrounded by palm trees. Special Attractions: Ibex ghost town; Several well-preserved talc mines; Sand dunes in Buckwheat Wash Valley. High-clearance 4WDs are preferred, but any high-clearance vehicle is acceptable. Expect a rough road surface; mud and sand are possible but will be easily passable. You may encounter rocks up to 6 inches in diameter, a loose road surface, and shelf roads, though these will be wide enough for passing or will have adequate pull-offs." Read more
Backcountry Adventures: Southern California (Adler Publishing )
Peter Massey & Jeanne Wilson
View more trails from this guide book
"The Ibex Dunes sit at the southern tip of Death Valley, in the small valley between the Saddle Peak Hills and the Ibex Hills. This trail runs along the western side of the dunes, far enough away that deep sand is not too much of a problem and near enough that photographers and others who appreciate the shape and form of the dunes can see them clearly. Initially the trail leaves California 127 and runs down a sandy wash, descending steadily to Ibex Valley. Out of the wash, the trail forks, with the trail to Ibex ghost town and spring leaving to the northwest. Ibex Dunes Trail follows around the edge of the valley, passing the warning sign for deep sand. The sandy patches are deep enough that 4WD is preferred, especially in the reverse direction, when you tackle them heading uphill. However, they are short and interspersed with firmer ground. Special Attractions: Ibex Sand Dunes; Saratoga Spring; Bird-watching and photography opportunities. High-clearance 4WDs are preferred, but any high-clearance vehicle is acceptable. Expect a rough road surface; mud and sand are possible but will be easily passable. You may encounter rocks up to 6 inches in diameter, a loose road surface, and shelf roads, though these will be wide enough for passing or will have adequate pull-offs." Read more

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Trail Information

Death Valley National Park
Nearby City
Death Valley National Park
Parks
Death Valley National Park
Local Contacts
USGS Ibex Pass, Old Ibex Pass, Ibex Spring, Owlshead Mts.
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Dec 2018