Eagle Wind Trail

Rabbit Mtn Open space, Colorado

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Eagle Wind Trail is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Boulder County, Colorado. It is within Rabbit Mtn Open space. It is 485 feet long and begins at 5,695 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 23 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Eagle Wind Trail is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Boulder County, Colorado. It is within Rabbit Mtn Open space. It is 485 feet long and begins at 5,695 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.2 miles with a total elevation gain of 23 feet. This trail connects with the following: Little Thompson Overlook Trail and Indian Mesa Trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, Road Biking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Rabbit Mtn Open space
Distance: 0.1
Elevation Gain: Minimal
Trailhead Elevation: 5,695 feet
Top Elevation: 5,718 feet
Accessibility: Kid-friendly
Driving Directions: Directions to Eagle Wind Trail
Parks: Rabbit Mtn Open space
Elevation Min/Max: 5695/5718 ft
Elevation Start/End: 5695/5695 ft
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Colorado's Best Wildflower Hikes: The Front Range

Colorado's Best Wildflower Hikes: The Front Range

For centuries, hunter-gatherers knew and appreciated Rabbit Mountain. Natural springs, plentiful game, edible plants, and encompassing views for security drew nomadic tribes here. Hikers today can follow in the footsteps of those early Native Americans who found many of the 60 or more wildflower species useful as well as beautiful. In the 1,500 acres of Rabbit Mountain Open Space, Eagle Wind’s 3.75-mile loop takes in flowery reaches and four-direction views as it ascends to travel along the west flank of an undulating hogback, crosses a saddle, and then heads north before turning west back to the parking area.

An early-morning hike on Eagle Wind Loop focuses light on the Continental Divide, while a late-afternoon hike throws long ponderosa-spiked shadows out across the plains and may feature the howl of coyotes. Late afternoon is also a time to watch out for approaching thunderstorms. As with many foothills areas, rattlesnakes make their homes here and may be above ground as long as the weather is warm—in fact, Rabbit Mountain was once called Rattlesnake Mountain. Wildflower alert: Myriad spring bloomers highlighted by fuchsia-colored prairie verbena and velvety purple skullcap.

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Best Loop Hikes Colorado

Best Loop Hikes Colorado

Boulder County’s Parks and Open Space program has done a tremendous job of preserving area lands from the relentless crush of sprawl that is devouring the Front Range. Nearly 70,000 acres have been set aside to protect critical wildlife habitat, ranches, and agricultural land, and to provide recreation opportunities for area residents and visitors. With the help of an extensive volunteer list, more than 80 miles of trails have been set aside for the enjoyment of multiple user groups.

This is a short loop with fine views of Longs Peak to the west, the Indian Peaks and Flatirons to the south, and Loveland and the plains to the east. The multiuse trail (hikers, horses, mountain bikes) follows a ridge through grasslands and pine forests that are important habitat for wildlife like deer, hawks and eagles, and many species of songbirds. Rabbit Mountain, which this hike circumnavigates, is an ideal close-to-town destination and a popular choice for a quick getaway.

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Best Hikes Near Denver and Boulder

Best Hikes Near Denver and Boulder

With a little luck, you might see a golden eagle soaring above Rabbit Mountain, looking for a tasty lunch. The cli?s of Rabbit Mountain are one of the few places in Boulder County where the magni?cent birds still build their nests. The trail climbs through a variety of shrubs, grasses, and patches of ponderosa pine where Native Americans once lived and hunted.

Views extend to Longs Peak and Mount Meeker, the Indian Peaks, Boulder’s foothills, and down along the southern Front Range. They include a panoramic view of the plains to the north, east, and south. Spring brings colorful wild?owers to this peaceful island in the sky.

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May 2018