Agua Caliente Creek Trail

Warner Springs, California

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1 Review
3 out of 5
Before the 1970s, the canyon of Agua Caliente Creek above Warner Springs seldom saw the intrusion of humans. After the Pacific Crest Trail was routed through, however, it became recognized as a pleasant camping spot for backpackers heading north toward Canada or south toward Mexico. This is one of only four places in San Diego County where the PCT dips to cross a fairly dependable stream, and the only place in the county where that trail closely follows running water for a fair distance.

Agua Caliente Creek Trail Professional Review and Guide

"Before the 1970s, the canyon of Agua Caliente Creek above Warner Springs seldom saw the intrusion of humans. After the Pacific Crest Trail was routed through, however, it became recognized as a pleasant camping spot for backpackers heading north toward Canada or south toward Mexico. This is one of only four places in San Diego County where the PCT dips to cross a fairly dependable stream, and the only place in the county where that trail closely follows running water for a fair distance."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Warner Springs
Distance: 8
Elevation Gain: 900 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate to Difficult
Duration: 4 hours
Season: November through May
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Local Contacts: Palomar Ranger District
Local Maps: USGS Warner Springs, Hot Springs Mtn.
Driving Directions: Directions to Agua Caliente Creek Trail

Recent Trail Reviews

10/18/2009
0

This hike, Agua Caliente Creek Trail (PTC Section B1) Warner Springs North bound to Lost Creek Road ~7.2 miles and back. We started, northbound, from the parking area, junction of Hwy79 and PTC. Good parking place along the Hwy. Pass through the gate to begin the trail. Trail was easy to follow, deep sand in the valleys, and dusty trails thoughout. Great views of Waner Springs area after 2 miles up the trail. Many trees with shade in the valleys areas. Trail has lots of up and down hill hikings, with a total elevation gain of 1000 feet at Lost Creek Rd. junction. Lost Creek rd. could be used to access the trail further up, and parking areas were seen on that road. Water was still flowing in the the upper part of the creek ~4.5 miles up, in mid-October. The lower part of the creek was dry. The water, further up the trail, was clear, and drinkable if filtered. Deer tracks were seen near the water. Soaking our feet in the creek was quite refreshing. Sailplane glider aircraft were visable in the sky, flying over the mountains toward the desert. The day, we hiked, was 90 degrees F and very dry. Be sure to take extra water or filter the water from the creek. :-) Big Al



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May 2018