Klamath Basin

Tulelake, California

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There are six wildlife refuges in the Klamath Basin, three of which (Upper Klamath, Klamath Marsh, and Bear Valley) lie north of the border in Oregon, and are beyond the scope of this book. The three refuges in California are the Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake. Lower Klamath and Tule Lake are the most accessible and provide outstanding birding opportunities. Tule Lake and Lower Klamath NWRs have been classified as Globally Important Bird Areas because they provide habitat for more than 30 percent of the world’s wintering population of Cackling Canada Goose, more than 20 percent of the world’s breeding population of White-faced Ibis, nearly 1 percent of North America’s wintering Bald Eagles, plus an incredible number of waterfowl. Specialty birds: Resident—Bald and Golden Eagles; Prairie Falcon; Black-billed Magpie; Canyon Wren; Western Meadowlark. Summer— Western and Clark’s Grebes; White-faced Ibis; Cinnamon Teal; Sandhill Crane; Long-billed Curlew; Black Tern; Short-eared Owl; Say’s Phoebe; Bank Swallow; Rock Wren; Tricolored and Yellow-headed Blackbirds; Bullock’s Oriole. Winter—Greater White-fronted and Ross’s Geese. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.
Birding Northern California

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Birding Northern California

by John Kemper (Falcon Guides)

There are six wildlife refuges in the Klamath Basin, three of which (Upper Klamath, Klamath Marsh, and Bear Valley) lie north of the border in Oregon, and are beyond the scope of this book. The three refuges in California are the Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake. Lower Klamath and Tule Lake are the most accessible and provide outstanding birding opportunities. Tule Lake and Lower Klamath NWRs have been classified as Globally Important Bird Areas because they provide habitat for more than 30 percent of the world’s wintering population of Cackling Canada Goose, more than 20 percent of the world’s breeding population of White-faced Ibis, nearly 1 percent of North America’s wintering Bald Eagles, plus an incredible number of waterfowl. Specialty birds: Resident—Bald and Golden Eagles; Prairie Falcon; Black-billed Magpie; Canyon Wren; Western Meadowlark. Summer— Western and Clark’s Grebes; White-faced Ibis; Cinnamon Teal; Sandhill Crane; Long-billed Curlew; Black Tern; Short-eared Owl; Say’s Phoebe; Bank Swallow; Rock Wren; Tricolored and Yellow-headed Blackbirds; Bullock’s Oriole. Winter—Greater White-fronted and Ross’s Geese. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

©  John Kemper/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Tulelake
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best April through July, for breeding birds; November through March for most raptors.
Local Contacts: Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuges.
Local Maps: DeLorme Northern California Atlas & Gazetteer.
Driving Directions: Directions to Klamath Basin

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May 2018