Sequoia National Park

Three Rivers, California

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Sequoia National Park ranges from the hot, dry foothills at Ash Mountain (1,700 feet), to Mount Whitney (14,494 feet), the highest peak in the lower 48 states. The largest trees in the world grow here—the giant sequoias. The park is popular and can be crowded on holidays and weekends. Campgrounds and lodgings fill up every night during the summer; however, the crowding is not as bad as publicity releases would have you believe, and you can find places where the birding is good and where you will see practically no one else. Specialty birds: Resident—Northern Goshawk, Golden Eagle; Peregrine Falcon; Blue Grouse, Mountain Quail, Western Screech-Owl; Northern Pygmy-Owl; White-throated Swift; Red-breasted Sapsucker; Acorn, Nuttall’s, and White-headed Woodpeckers; Steller’s Jay; Clark’s Nutcracker; Mountain Chickadee; Canyon Wren; American Dipper; Western Bluebird; Townsend’s Solitaire; Wrentit; California Thrasher; Spotted and California Towhees; Rufous-crowned Sparrow; Lesser Goldfinch. Summer—Flammulated Owl; Common Poorwill; Calliope Hummingbird; Western Wood-Pewee; Hammond’s and Ash-throated Flycatchers; Hermit and MacGillivray’s Warblers; Western Tanager; Green-tailed Towhee; Black-headed Grosbeak; Bullock’s Oriole; Lawrence’s Goldfinch. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

Sequoia National Park Professional Review and Guide

"Sequoia National Park ranges from the hot, dry foothills at Ash Mountain (1,700 feet), to Mount Whitney (14,494 feet), the highest peak in the lower 48 states. The largest trees in the world grow here—the giant sequoias. The park is popular and can be crowded on holidays and weekends. Campgrounds and lodgings fill up every night during the summer; however, the crowding is not as bad as publicity releases would have you believe, and you can find places where the birding is good and where you will see practically no one else. Specialty birds: Resident—Northern Goshawk, Golden Eagle; Peregrine Falcon; Blue Grouse, Mountain Quail, Western Screech-Owl; Northern Pygmy-Owl; White-throated Swift; Red-breasted Sapsucker; Acorn, Nuttall’s, and White-headed Woodpeckers; Steller’s Jay; Clark’s Nutcracker; Mountain Chickadee; Canyon Wren; American Dipper; Western Bluebird; Townsend’s Solitaire; Wrentit; California Thrasher; Spotted and California Towhees; Rufous-crowned Sparrow; Lesser Goldfinch. Summer—Flammulated Owl; Common Poorwill; Calliope Hummingbird; Western Wood-Pewee; Hammond’s and Ash-throated Flycatchers; Hermit and MacGillivray’s Warblers; Western Tanager; Green-tailed Towhee; Black-headed Grosbeak; Bullock’s Oriole; Lawrence’s Goldfinch. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information."

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Three Rivers
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best June through August for higher elevations (Giant Forest); winter and spring for lower elevations (Hospital Rock).
Local Contacts: Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks.
Local Maps: DeLorme Northern California Atlas & Gazetteer.
Driving Directions: Directions to Sequoia National Park

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May 2018