Myrtle Creek Trail

Smith River National Recreation Area, California

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Myrtle Creek Trail is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Del Norte County, California. It is within Smith River National Recreation Area. It is 0.2 miles long and begins at 213 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 74 feet.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Myrtle Creek Trail is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Del Norte County, California. It is within Smith River National Recreation Area. It is 0.2 miles long and begins at 213 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 74 feet.
Activity Type: Hiking, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, Road Biking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Smith River National Recreation Area
Distance: 0.2
Elevation Gain: 74 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 213 feet
Top Elevation: 221 feet
Parks: Smith River National Recreation Area
Elevation Min/Max: 198/221 ft
Elevation Start/End: 213/213 ft

Myrtle Creek Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"This is an easily accessible, short day hike with the feel of a backcountry wilderness area. The trail follows the course of a water diversion ditch that was used for a turn-of-the-century hydraulic mining operation. Along the way, interpretive signs explain a little of the history, and a lot of the diverse flora in the surrounding forest, part of the Myrtle Creek Botanical Area."

"Lying at the boundary of two distinct soil types and positioned halfway between the cool coastal zone and the warmer interior forest, the Myrtle Creek Botanical Area has received one of four special botanical designations within the Smith River Watershed. While the botanical area contains nearly 2,000 acres and ranges in elevation between 200 and 1,400 feet, the Myrtle Creek Trail is a 1-mile romp through the lower elevations above the namesake creek. The trail packs a lot of interest and diversity, including second-growth redwood forest and mixed evergreen forest, into a small package. Interpretive signs provide extensive insights into the human and natural history of this unique environment."

"This is an easily accessible, short day hike with the feel of a backcountry wilderness area. The trail follows the course of a water diversion ditch that was used for a turn-of-the-twentieth-century hydraulic mining operation. Along the way, interpretive signs explain a little of the history and a lot about the diverse flora in the surrounding forest, part of the Myrtle Creek Botanical Area. Crescent City investors had good reason to expect a return on their money when they founded the Myrtle Creek Mining Company in 1894. After all, placer mining (panning for gold) during previous years had turned up some impressive nuggets in the drainage. The largest single nugget found in the creek was the size and shape of an ax bit and weighed in at a healthy forty-seven ounces. With the easy pickings gone, however, the new miners turned immediately to hydraulic mining, which allowed them to extract the tiny deposits left in the sand and soil. For a time the effort paid off, but by the early 1920s the gold had become too expensive to remove profitably, and the mine closed. Today only the ditch, a few pipes and trestle timbers, and the slowly healing scars remain."

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