Cahuilla Mountain Trail 2E45

San Bernardino National Forest, California

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Cahuilla Mountain Trail #2E45 is a hiking trail in Riverside County, California. It is within San Bernardino National Forest and Cahuilla Mountain Wilderness. It is three miles long and begins at 4,534 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 6.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 2,093 feet. Near the trailhead there are parking and an information board. The trail ends near Cahuilla Mountain (elevation 5,525 feet).
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Cahuilla Mountain Trail #2E45 is a hiking trail in Riverside County, California. It is within San Bernardino National Forest and Cahuilla Mountain Wilderness. It is three miles long and begins at 4,534 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 6.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 2,093 feet. Near the trailhead there are parking and an information board. The trail ends near Cahuilla Mountain (elevation 5,525 feet).
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: San Bernardino National Forest
Distance: 3.0
Elevation Gain: 2,093 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 4,534 feet
Top Elevation: 5,611 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Cahuilla Mountain Trail #2E45
Parks: San Bernardino National Forest
Elevation Min/Max: 4534/5611 ft
Elevation Start/End: 4534/4534 ft

Cahuilla Mountain Trail #2E45 Professional Reviews and Guides

"Cahuilla Mountain, its stony battlements facing southward, rises in lonely isolation above Cahuilla Valley, 10 miles southwest of the San Jacintos proper. The mountain is seldom visited nowadays, yet it is the setting for the climax of one
of the most famous novels of early-day California.

The novel, of course, is Helen Hunt Jackson’s Ramona, published in 1884. This trip relives these stirring events of the past as it visits Juan Diego Flat and climbs to the top of Cahuilla Mountain for a breathtaking view over the country of Ramona and the Cahuillas."

"The trail leads up the northeast side of the mountain through the chaparral. It then follows the summit ridge through a forest of black oaks and Jeffrey and Coulter pines. In 2.5 miles, pass a signed trail on the right leading 0.1 mile down to a small spring where water is usually available in the wet season. There are several bumps of nearly equal height along the ridge. The trail leads to the southeastern summit, which at 5635 feet is the high point of the mountain."

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May 2018