San Gorgonio Mountain Backpacking

Redlands, California

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1 Review
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The rounded, talus-strewn summit of San Gorgonio Mountain (or “Grey-back,” as it was called long ago) crowns the San Bernardino Mountains and regally presides over thousands of square miles of varied Southern California terrain. The mountain’s 11,499-foot elevation qualifies it as the highest peak in California south of the Tehachapi Mountains. The way up and back down is long and challenging. Even so, no California peak-bagger’s long-term itinerary is complete without a visit to the top.
Backpacking California: Mountain, Foothill, Coastal, & Desert Adventures in the Golden State

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Backpacking California: Mountain, Foothill, Coastal, & Desert Adventures in the Golden State

by Author varies by trail (Wilderness Press)

The rounded, talus-strewn summit of San Gorgonio Mountain (or “Grey-back,” as it was called long ago) crowns the San Bernardino Mountains and regally presides over thousands of square miles of varied Southern California terrain.

The mountain’s 11,499-foot elevation qualifies it as the highest peak in California south of the Tehachapi Mountains. The way up and back down is long and challenging. Even so, no California peak-bagger’s long-term itinerary is complete without a visit to the top.

© 2008 Author varies by trail/Wilderness Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking
Nearby City: Redlands
Distance: 9.6
Elevation Gain: 3,400 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate to Difficult
Duration: 2 days
Season: Late spring, summer, and fall
Local Contacts: San Bernardino National Forest - permit required
Local Maps: USGS 7.5-min. Forest Falls and San Gorgonio Mountain or U.S. Forest Service Guide to the San Gorgonio Wilderness
Driving Directions: Directions to San Gorgonio Mountain (Backpacking)

Recent Trail Reviews

8/12/2007
0

We made this trip the opposite way than it is described here. We started at around 10 am on Saturday (before getting our permit earlier at the Ranger Station and dropping of two the two cars) and it took us about 7 hours (with over 40 pounds of weight on our back) to reach Dollar Lake Saddle at 10,000 feet. After another hour, we decided to stay at High Meadow Springs Camp for the night (instead of Anderson Flat Camp, where we planned). In my opinion, High Meadow Springs Camp is the best location for an overnight stay going this direction - very quite, hidden in the forest and with a beautiful view (there are only one or two places to set up a tent). Since we brought all our water (8 liters), we were not depending on any spring. Although the Rangers gave us a list with a couple of places where one could find some water, everything currently seems to be really dry. Even Dollar Lake was dry! After a beautiful night in the mountains, we continued our hike the next morning and it only took us (now only carrying 20-30 pounds) 6 hours to hike the 13 miles back to our second car. But believe me, the last 4 miles were brutal and although we are both in an excellent shape, this was close to our limits. After all, we made it and it was a great hike with very scenic views (even better than Baldy or Jacinto). Here some facts of our hike: START: Jenks Lake Road, Angelus Oaks (N34°09.663, W116°52.316, elevation: 6,916 feet) FIRST DAY: 8.4 miles, 8 hours CAMP(overnight): High Meadow Springs (N34°07.499, W116°52.022, elevation: 10,226 feet) SECOND DAY: 12.8 miles, 6 hours, including 4 peaks (Shields (10,680), Anderson (10,864), San Bernardino East (10,691) and San Bernardino Peak (10,649)) FINISH (drop off of our first car): Highway 38, Angelus Oaks, exit right and turn left towards the fire station, continue for a couple of feet and make a right to the parking area for the San Bernardino Peak trailhead (N34°08.768, W116°58.705, elevation: 5,912 feet)



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May 2018