Golden Gate Bridge Bike Approach

Presidio, California

Distance3.4mi
Elevation Gain394ft
Trailhead Elevation242ft
Top243ft
Elevation Min/Max27/243ft
Elevation Start/End242/242ft
Golden Gate Bridge Bike Approach is a hiking and biking trail in San Francisco, California. It is within Presidio and Marin Headlands (GGNRA). It is 3.4 miles long and begins at 242 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 3.5 miles with a total elevation gain of 394 feet. The Fort Baker Military Reservation (elevation 240 feet) military is near the trailhead. There is also a telephone. Along the trail there are bicycle parking. The trail ends near the Battery Lancaster ruins. There are also a cliff and an information board near the end of the trail.

Golden Gate Bridge Bike Approach Professional Reviews and Guides

"This hardy hike spends more time hemmed in by coastal chaparral than the headlands’ surf-battered shores. But the highlights that make this a standout hike include historic battery sites with unique vantage points to appreciate the iconic Golden Gate Bridge, hiking the California Coastal Trail and the Bay Area Ridge Trail, and a worthwhile descent to stunning Black Sands Beach.

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area was created out of land and facilities formerly owned by the US military. Grassroots groups under the banner of People for a Golden Gate National Recreation Area, supported by visionary politicians of the 1960s, campaigned for the federal government to purchase the land to protect it from development and preserve the ecological and scenic wealth of the landscape as well as the cultural heritage and historical landmarks."

"A graceful sweep of perfection, the Golden Gate Bridge is the defining landmark of Northern California. It is a marvel of human ingenuity that spanned an impossible gap across a violent strait, an engineering masterpiece famous the world over."

"People who have never been to San Francisco or know very little about the city, at least know about the Golden Gate Bridge. The taut swag of its cables, recognizable in silhouette form, are an emblem of the city. Its color, International Orange, is associated specifically with the bridge. The bridge stands apart from the city—buffered by the parklands of the Presidio on the south end and the Marin Headlands on the north end—and its structure and natural setting complement one another. Very subtly, however, the bridge gets the upper hand over its environs. The bridge is obviously not as old as the hills that receive either of its ends, but the hills nevertheless appear to be there for the bridge. And the fog, which has always poured into San Francisco Bay through the Golden Gate strait, seems to serve the purpose of dramatically enhancing the bridge, concealing and unveiling its two towers and continually adjusting the natural light reflected on the bridge during the day. Ultimately, of course, the bridge serves us, making it possible for human traffic to travel to and from Marin County and beyond. Most thoughtfully, the bridge has a walkway on its eastern side so it is possible to cross the Golden Gate on foot to admire the views and ponder all that this bridge stands for. It was designed as a monument to progress, and if we are awed by the bridge, we must be awed by ourselves."

"While there’s no denying that the main draw of this walk/hike is the Golden Gate Bridge, a loop along the bluffs between Baker Beach and the bridge itself brims with beautiful vistas and provocative historic sites.

The Golden Gate is a tangible symbol of the vitality, elegance, and strength of the City by the Bay; the wall-to-wall batteries on the headlands flanking the spectacular structure symbolize just how hard its residents—and a nation— were prepared to fight to protect it."

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Trail Information

Presidio
Nearby City
Marin Headlands (GGNRA)
Parks
Dog-friendly
Accessibility
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Activity Feed

Jun 2018