Western Divide Highway

Porterville, California

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2 Reviews
5 out of 5
The Western Divide Highway has many of the qualities of Sequoia National Park, but with only a fraction of the crowds. The road up from the foothills is steep, narrow, and twisty. When you get to about the 6,000-foot level, the road turns into an excellent high-standard highway through a wonderful forest next to emerald meadows, much like the Generals Highway from Giant Forest to Grant Grove. There is even a grove of giant sequoia trees. The campgrounds are generally peaceful, except on weekends, when they fill up. Specialty birds: Resident—Northern Goshawk; Mountain Quail; Redbreasted Sapsucker; White-headed Woodpecker; Steller’s Jay; Townsend’s Solitaire; Wrentit; Cassin’s Finch. Summer—Black Swift; Calliope Hummingbird; Western Wood-Pewee; Hammond’s Flycatcher; Black-throated Gray, MacGillivray’s, and Hermit Warblers; Green-tailed Towhee; Black-chinned Sparrow; Lazuli Bunting; Bullock’s Oriole. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

Western Divide Highway Professional Review and Guide

"The Western Divide Highway has many of the qualities of Sequoia National Park, but with only a fraction of the crowds. The road up from the foothills is steep, narrow, and twisty. When you get to about the 6,000-foot level, the road turns into an excellent high-standard highway through a wonderful forest next to emerald meadows, much like the Generals Highway from Giant Forest to Grant Grove. There is even a grove of giant sequoia trees. The campgrounds are generally peaceful, except on weekends, when they fill up. Specialty birds: Resident—Northern Goshawk; Mountain Quail; Redbreasted Sapsucker; White-headed Woodpecker; Steller’s Jay; Townsend’s Solitaire; Wrentit; Cassin’s Finch. Summer—Black Swift; Calliope Hummingbird; Western Wood-Pewee; Hammond’s Flycatcher; Black-throated Gray, MacGillivray’s, and Hermit Warblers; Green-tailed Towhee; Black-chinned Sparrow; Lazuli Bunting; Bullock’s Oriole. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information."

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Porterville
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best April through June for lower elevations such as at Milepost 3; May to August for Quaking Aspen and Redwood Meadow.
Local Contacts: Hot Springs Ranger District; Tule River Ranger District;
Local Maps: DeLorme Northern California Atlas & Gazetteer.
Driving Directions: Directions to Western Divide Highway

Recent Trail Reviews

6/8/2009
0

The great western divide highway is awesome! Little traffic and many scenic spots. We seen a plethora of different flowers and if your quick enough there are always chipmunks to see. We actually seen a momma grouse with her little flock, deer, and of course those chipmunks that seem to want to play chicken.


7/15/2006
0

This is a very pretty area that sees little use. The big trees rival the ones in Sequioa National Park with a fraction of the crowds. Most people seem to by pass this area for the big national park nearby. The scenery is more subtle but still fantastic. Combine this with a trip to the Kern river plateau and it is like being put into a John Wayne movie set



Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018